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simulations, and then use them to understand the entire casting process. “Te program really appeals to students who want to experience working in the real world on a career path of their choice,” Hoefert said. “And for Eck Industries, this is a great opportunity to share what the foundry industry is all about. Students may otherwise go through high school and college without ever giving thought to choosing this industry path.” As Hoefert points out, a lot of students don’t know how much the industry might appeal to them. For one reason or another, it escapes their scope. “It appeals to people that like to make things,” Hoefert said. “Before I learned anything about


castings, I just thought it was some- thing as simple as making ice cubes– just pour the liquid into the mold, let it cool down and it’s done,” Vazquez said. For any company interested in


such a program, Hoefert recom- mends they contact their local high school or technical college to see what might be available in their area. “Be a mentor who wants to work


with youths,” Hoefert said. “Consider this an investment in your future workforce and in promoting your company to your community: Keep it real, and keep it fun.”


Higher Learning and Application Getting youths like Vazquez to


Emanuel Vazquez, left, has been mentored by Dan Hoefert at Eck Industries.


know about casting and the intellec- tual challenges it entails is one thing; enticing them to pursue a career once they’re in college is another. When he’s recruiting high school-


ers, Rosmait tries to engage them in campus activities. Tey can take in open houses and see the facilities in action. At PSU, an event called “Gorilla Games” includes a chance to see different types of technologies, including metalcasting and a session called “Molten Metal Magic.” “Our strategies for students within our program is to engage them in


courses where metalcasting processes are covered,” Rosmait said. “Getting these students involved in activi- ties like AFS meeting events, open foundry nights and company day events allows them to interact with foundry professionals.” Scott Giese, professor, University of


Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa, tries similar things. He said UNI aims to give students a hands-on experience, combined with lectures. He also presents how casting can


provide interesting mental challenges. “I tell them the technical and


professional skills learned and prac- ticed in the metalcasting program are valuable for the future and are transferable to any engineering or technical discipline,” Giese said. “I tell potential students that metalcast- ing is the hardest, but yet the broadest technology discipline. It impacts the automotive, agricultural, computer, telecommunication industries. By using this approach, I have discovered I have more interest in our academic program, doubling our enrollment in the last five years. “Once they are in the program and


Ken Murphy conducts a Foundry in a Box presentation at Chelsea Park Elementary School, Chelsea, Alabama.


26 | MODERN CASTING April 2016


see all the cool opportunities they have and the interconnected relation- ship with every industry, they want to pursue a career in metalcasting.” Giese said the university’s main recruitment tool is getting its name


Photo Courtesy of Ken Murphy.


Photo Courtesy of Dan Hoefert.


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