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INDUSTRY news


Die Castings Play Structural Role in Cadillac CT6 Cadillac, Detroit, will use an


advanced mixed-material approach for the lightweight body structure of the CT6 sedan. T e structure is alumi-


num intensive, but the new Cadillac also includes 13 diff erent materials customized for each area of the car to improve driving dynamics, fuel


economy and cabin quietness. T irteen high-pressure diecast


components make up the lower structure of the CT6 body, along with aluminum sheets and extrusions. T e CT6 debuted in March at


the New York International Auto Show and will enter production late this year at General Motors’ Detroit- Hamtramck assembly plant. “T is is the rocket science of auto-


mobile construction and manufactur- ing today,” said Johan de Nysschen, president, Cadillac. “With the CT6, we used high-strength aluminum, high-strength steels and lightweight chassis components.” Weight reduction helps improve


Cadillac’s CT6 sedan includeS 13 diecast components in the lower structure of the body.


fuel effi ciency and aids in creating a more resilient passenger cell. T e CT6 body structure is 64% aluminum, including all exterior body panels, and the mixed material approach saved 198 lbs. (90 kg). ■


New Iron Casting Facility Close to Completion in Georgia According to the Columbia Coun-


ty News-Times, a new 50,000-sq.- ft. white iron casting facility in Grovetown, Ga., will open this month and become fully operational this summer. T e facility will serve GIW In-


dustries, a pump supplier that is a full subsidiary of global mining company KSB Group, Frankenthal, Germany. T e current expansion, which also


includes added heat treatment capa- bilities, will ensure that KSB’s GIW Minerals products will be ready for growing market demands. It is part of a $75-million fi ve-year investment plan that also includes a new distribu- tion center and upgrades to a produc- tion facility in T omson, Ga. T e expansion meets the re-


quirements needed to handle larger components, allowing the company to increase effi ciencies while continuing to uphold its world-class quality and safety standards. “In the entire world, only 10%


of iron foundries make white irons, and nobody can make the materi-


The expansion will add 50,000 sq. ft. of space to the existing metalcasting operations (shown) at GIW Industry’s Grovetown, Ga., location.


8 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | May/Jun 2015


als we do,” said Richard Sterzen, industrial engineering manager at GIW Industries. “In addition, there are only a few foundries that can manufacture the large casting sizes our customers need.” GIW Industries started as a small metalcasting and machine shop and


has been in business for well over a century. Its facilities have been located in Grovetown and T omson for 49 and 40 years. T e current expansion will provide new permanent employee positions, along with a large number of temporary construction jobs over the next three to four years. ■


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