search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
19


Luther understood the common priest- hood that believers share with Christ


through baptism not as a way to divide the clergy and laity but as a way to unite them in the single body of Christ. He felt that within that body, or common priesthood, different members have different “offices,” but all are spiritually equal in God’s grace.


20


Luther probably never said “Here I stand” when appearing at his trial before


Emperor Charles V in the city of Worms. Instead he or a compatriot wrote it (in German) in a Latin description of the events of 1521 to emphasize Luther’s refusal to recant what he had written.


his marriage in 1525, thinking of himself as a “Daniel in the lion’s den” of monastic practices.


24 25


Even though Luther did not always mind that people called his followers “Lutherans,” he


preferred to think of all believers as “Christians.” In German-speaking areas, the usual designation is “evangelisch”—that is, people oriented toward the gospel.


Luther had deep respect for the role of government in keeping good order and just


laws in a society, but he also thought that a Christian prince “would be a rare bird in heaven.”


Above: Luther at the Diet of Worms, by Anton von Werner, 1877. Below: Luther Bible, 1534. 21


However, Luther did say this at the Diet (parliament) held in the imperial city of


Worms: “Unless I am convinced by the testimony of the Scriptures or by clear reason … I am bound by the Scriptures that I have quoted and my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and I will not retract anything, since it is neither safe nor right to go against conscience.”


22 23


Luther’s translation of the New Testament (which he completed in just a few weeks


while in hiding at Wartburg Castle) was not the first printed German translation. All previous translations were based upon the Latin “Vulgate”; Luther was the first to use the original Greek text.


Although his superior had released him from his vows as an Augustinian friar, Luther maintained a monastic lifestyle until shortly before


38 JUNE 2017 See all 50


facts by clicking on the “Reformation” tab at livinglutheran.org.


Timothy Wengert, an ELCA pastor, is professor emeritus of Reformation history at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52