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pagesofhistory Honored at Last


The remains of Medal of Honor recipient Army Sgt. Charles Schroeter are reinterred with military honors after spending nearly a century in a communal crypt.


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he remains of Sgt. Charles Schroeter, a decorated Army veteran of the American Civil War


and the Indian Wars that followed, were laid to rest with full military honors July 9, 2015, after more than nine decades in an unmarked communal crypt at Greenwood Cemetery in San Diego. Schroeter served in the 1st Missouri


Volunteer Cavalry Regiment during the Civil War and with the 8th U.S. Cavalry Regiment during the Snake War in the western U.S. In 1870, Schroeter received the Medal of Honor for gallantry during the Campaign of the Rocky Mesa, Arizona Territory, in October 1869. Later in his ca- reer, he joined the Marine Corps, eventu- ally rejoined the Army, and finally retired in 1894. Schroeter is believed to have been 87 when he died in 1921. His cremated remains were held in the communal crypt until a group of San Diego veterans learned of his story and worked with the National Cemetery Administration to have Schroeter reinterred at Miramar National Cemetery in San Diego. Several veterans and high-ranking mili- tary officials attended the ceremony, dur- ing which the 11th Armored Cavalry honor guard conducted a flag ceremony. “Today, we bring Sergeant Schroeter


to a distinguished place to rest, a place he properly deserves,” said then-Brig. Gen. Joseph M. Martin, commanding general of the Army National Training Center and Fort


Irwin, Calif. “From birth to death, he lived a life of duty in order to honor his country.”


A


Painting Documents Air Force History painting titled Deterrence on Demand, depicting airmen of the 307th Bomb Wing at Barks-


dale AFB, La., was pre- sented to the Air Force Art Program by Lt. Gen. James Jackson, chief of the Air Force Reserve, during the Reserve Officers Associa- tion national convention July 27, 2015.


The painting was cre-


ated by Maj. Warren Neary, USAF, winner of the 2015 Air Force Association Na- tional Aerospace Gill Robb Wilson Award for Arts and Letters. It shows airmen of the 307th Bomb Wing generating their aircraft for a nuclear exercise with aircrew, maintainers, and security forces members. The 307th was the first reserve unit in Air Force history to be nuclear-certified. Neary has served as a member of the Air


Force Art Program for 14 years and has cre- ated 23 paintings for the program and the Army Center for Military History.


MO


— Don Vaughan, a North Carolina-based free- lance writer, authors this monthly column.


PHOTO: COURTESY MIRAMAR NATIONAL CEMETERY SUPPORT FOUNDATION JANUARY 2016 MILITARY OFFICER 85


History Lesson On Jan. 5, 1781, American traitor turned British Brig. Gen. Benedict Arnold, along with 1,600 troops, captured and destroyed Richmond, Va. — his greatest success as a British commander.


Army Sgt. 1st Class Joshua Gendron, 11th Ar- mored Cavalry, car- ries the urn bearing Army Sgt. Charles Schroeter’s remains.


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