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LEGISLATIVE NEWS THAT AFFECTS YOU Part B Relief


A Medicare Part B solution was included in the bipartisan budget agreement. Although the deal prevents a 52-percent hike, millions still will see a significant increase.


T


he budget deal passed in October 2015 keeps millions of Medicare beneficiaries from


being stuck with a 52-percent premium hike in January. Seventy percent of Medicare benefi- ciaries will be “held harmless” and will see no premium hike for 2016. The other 30 percent will see a premium increase in 2016 — but a much smaller hike than if Congress hadn’t passed relief legislation.


Those who will see higher Part B pre- miums include people who:  will enroll in Medicare for the first time in 2016, or  had incomes above $85,000 a year ($170,000 for couples), or  are enrolled in Medicare but not receiv- ing a Social Security check. The chart below shows how much


2016 premiums will rise for those in the higher income brackets.


Individual/ Joint Income


Under $85K/ Under $170K


$85K-$107K/ $170K-$214K


$107K-$160K/ $214K-$320K


$160K-$214K/ $320K-$428K


Above $214K/ Above $428K


2016 Monthly Medicare Part B Premiums 2015


2016 † Premium


$146 $105


$209 $272


$335


† Beneficiaries protected by held-harmless provision ‡ Beneficiaries not protected by held-harmless provision


Because of the zero COLA, there is no Medicare premium hike in 2016 for beneficia- ries who were paying the basic rate of $105 a month in 2015. But all others, includ- ing first-time enrollees in 2016, will see the premium increases shown.


JANUARY 2016 MILITARY OFFICER 35


Premium $105


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Top Gun Again The Hill daily newspaper once again has named MOAA a top lobbyist in the associations cat- egory. This is the ninth consecutive year MOAA has been recognized.


2016 ‡ Premium


$171 $122


$244 $317


$390


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