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BOARD [CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15]


Guard, one Public Health Service, one NOAA, and five at-large (without regard to service affiliation).  Directors must be active duty, Reserve, National Guard, retired, or former uniformed service officers or surviving spouses and members of the association.  Directors hold office for six years.  Each director represents the total association and not a regional or ser- vice constituency.  The board directs and controls the business management and af- fairs of the association and has the authority to approve contracts, incur liabilities, expend funds, and attend to other association matters. There are no grade or other limita- tions on the number of officers who may serve as directors at any one time. Efforts are made to obtain the best- qualified members from within the membership of the association.


Service on the board Directors serve one six-year term and discharge their governance responsibilities primarily by partici- pating in the three board meetings convened each year. Each board meeting includes meetings of the various standing committees and re- quires about one-and-a-half days, not including travel. A director should be able to de-


vote two to three weeks each year to MOAA matters, including travel, board and committee meetings, and participation in other events such as the annual Council Presidents’ Seminar, regional chapter leaders’ symposia, and individual visits to councils and chapters. A director must refrain from activi-


ties that could reasonably be viewed as conflicting with or possibly influenc- ing the director’s judgment regarding his or her responsibilities to MOAA. Directors receive no compensation, but they are reimbursed for MOAA- related travel, lodging, and meals.


MO 20 MILITARY OFFICER JANUARY 2016 yourviews


This concept is beyond ridiculous and helps to contribute to the enor- mous cost of running DoD. —Maj. Robert J. Souders, USAF (Ret)


Clearwater (Fla.) Chapter via email


State Report Card The “State Report Card” section of the November 2015 [Military Officer] could use an update. Beginning Jan. 1, 2016, Maine will no longer tax any retired military pay. … I live in Maine and have lobbied for this change in the tax laws. Maine is a terrific place to call home and now has another reason for retirees to consider moving here. —Capt.Wayne A. Peters, USN(Ret) Pine Tree Chapter ofMaine, LifeMember via email


Please check your [“State Report Card”] data on military retirement pay exemption for the state of Connecticut. … Last year, the general assembly passed and the governor signed a public act to exempt 100 percent of military retirement pay from state income taxes. —Capt. J.W. “Bill” Sheehan,USN(Ret) LifeMember


Waterford, Conn.


I always look forward to, and enjoy, your annual report card on state-level policies and benefits for military veterans, retirees, and families. Though I no longer reside there, as a native Iowan who maintains family and business interests in the state, I keep abreast of Iowa tax law developments and changes. In that context, I note that there is perhaps a discrepancy between in- formation presented on pages 67-68 of the November issue (showing


retired/survivor pay to be partially exempt from Iowa taxes) and the informational map on page 76, which appears to show that retired pay is fully exempt from Iowa state taxation. For those not otherwise already


aware, I thought I would point out that, effective Jan. 1, 2014, military retired benefits, including full mili- tary retired pay and [Survivor Ben- efit Plan] benefits, are now excluded from Iowa Individual Income Tax, regardless of the recipient’s age. … The retired pay must have been included in the taxpayer’s federal adjusted gross income to receive this exemption, and the exemption is in addition to the general pension ex- emption ($6,000 for single/$12,000 for married), which is available only to taxpayers 55 years of age or older. The Iowa military retired pay and benefit exclusion is available both to residents and nonresidents of the state who are otherwise required to file Iowa state income tax returns. —Col. Theron S. Bailey, USAF (Ret) LifeMember via email


Corrections: In “State Report Card,” November 2015, as noted above, Connecticut and Iowa should have received green dots for bothMilitary Retired Pay and Survivor Benefits in the Exempt from State Taxation category. The Veteran & Retiree Ben- efits chart also failed to note military retired pay and survivor benefits will be 100-percent exempt from state taxation inMaine beginning in 2016. A designated scholarship in


memory ofMaj. Evans C. Thornton, USAR, awarded to Shona G. Neary was omitted from “MOAA Schol- ars,” November 2015.


For submission information, see page 6.


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