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INDUSTRY PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP ABOUT MHC’S


al income and expense is an important step to the equation. Having a reliable list of valuable resources can help guide you with less con- crete items like pricing estimates, market prices (investigate what oth- er stables charge for board, whether or not the rates are all-inclusive, how “all-inclusive” is defined in your market) and estimated costs. This type of research will aid in making informed business decisions, which should help you to maximize projected net income.


TIP #4. Stick To Your Plan As you move along with your business decisions, you may find your- self challenged by unexpected expenses. It is important to plan for unexpected costs along the way – they happen. Being proactive by creating a nest-egg of savings is a great best management practice to make sure you can continue to stick to your budget, even in adverse situations. This business strategy can help prepare your business and family for the unexpected.


TIP #5. Review Your Plan Continuously Make time throughout the year to review your plan, where you stand according to your budget, and make adjustments for items that have changed. Pricing can change, along with future market forecast- ing and interruptions, which can force you to evaluate your business decisions. Don’t just focus on the beginning and the end, and make sure to manage it continuously. A good financial manager will monitor their finances throughout the entire year. Remember, crafting your personal or business budget for the com-


ing year can be a valuable business management tool to prepare you for your future goals. We know the thought of starting on this may be overwhelming, but Farm Credit can help! We provide free budget tem- plates – and much more!


WELCOME NEW MEMBERS: COEXIST STABLES In 2018, Elizabeth Tonti and James Hillman launched their business, Coexist Stables, in Mount Airy, on Serra Valley Farm. Why “Coex- ist” as a name? Explains Elizabeth, “Our name comes from a belief that all riding disciplines require specific skills which can be carried over to other disciplines. We believe everyone can learn from each other through mutual re-


spect.” This winter, Elizabeth and James launched a sister-business, a non-profit called Thoroughbred Retraining At Coexist Stables. With this program, the couple plans to acquire off-track Thoroughbreds, bring them up through the various programs and shows offered through the Retired Racehorse Project, and then move them on to new homes.


ST. PATRICK’S RACING STABLE LLC Welcome new member St. Patrick’s Racing Stable


LLC, based in Fair Hill and owned by Maine native Mel- lissa Perrin-Keithly. In addition to St. Patrick’s Racing Stable, Mellissa owns Soulshine Yoga Farm, featuring yoga for equestions, and a business repurposing horse show ribbons called “Blue Ribbon Girl.”


MARYLAND HORSE COUNCIL


WELCOME NEW & RENEWED MEMBERS! Keene Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram (Ashley Adams Aycock) • Pleasant View Farms (Suzette Bizzarro) • Nixie Hollow Stables (Leah Groner)


THIS EQUIERY COLUMN IS FOR YOU! This monthly column in The Equiery, (which is owned and published


by the Maryland Horse Council) is designed to meet the demands of MHC’s Industry Professional Members: a place where you can publi- cize your professional news and updates. Have you taken on a new partner? Hired a new manager or trainer? Brought a new vet into your practice? Promoted an employee? Moved your location? Received a commendation or award? Changed brokerages or practices? Hired a new director of development? If so, we want to know! Please send your news to IndustryNews@mdhorsecouncil.org.


WHAT IS AN INDUSTRY PROFESSIONAL? Industry Professional Memberships are open to owners and manag- ers of equine or equine-related businesses, farms and shows/events, and to independent contractors and service providers. Equine businesses include (but are not limited to) farms and stables of- fering any equine-related service (such as boarding, training, lessons, trail rides, pony parties, breeding, mare care, foaling, carriage horses, and equine entertainment). Equine-related businesses include (but are not limited to) tack, feed and other retail stores; trailer manufacturers, sales & service; shipping; feed mills; manufacturers of saddles, supplements, tack, and shoes; hay, straw, shavings, feed, and other products; insurance, financial, le- gal, accounting, and marketing services ; auction houses and sales sites; competition venues and race tracks; veterinary practices and hospitals. Independent contractors include (but are not limited to) veterinari-


ans, farriers, equine therapists, saddle fitters, trainers, instructors, stall muckers, braiders, and equine dentists.


Industry Professional Membership Benefits include: •





• •





direct input into policy and advocacy by the Maryland Horse Council on State of Maryland legislative and regulatory affairs, to protect and grow the diverse Maryland horse industry


exclusive invitations to Business Networking events and seminars (not open to any other membership category)


business logo and link on MHC member directory page


discounts on select nationally known products and services, such as John Deere, Sherwin Williams, Suncast, Nationwide, Redbrand, US Equestrian, New Holland, Toro, eXmark, tenda – and more


exclusive discounts for advertising and marketing via The Equi- ery’s multi-media products. Contact Tracy McKenna to find out more! tracy@equiery.com or 410-802-4219


Annual Membership Dues: $100 Lifetime Membership: $1,000


www.equiery.com | 800-244-9580


THANK YOU TO OUR MAJOR SPONSORS


THE EQUIERY A MARYLAND HORSE COUNCIL PUBLICATION | MARCH 2021 | 53


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