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News


World’s largest 3D printer to produce two-storey house


The world’s largest 3D printer is set to start creating a two-storey house on the site of Kamp C, the provincial Centre for Sustainability and Innovation in Westerlo, Belgium. The C3PO-project has partnered with several Belgian organisations and aims to introduce the Flemish construction industry to this new technology. “The concrete printer mainly offers a lot of added value for more complex building components,” says Kai van Bulck, Kamp C representative in the C3PO-project. “We can now start to test all this theoretical know-how in practice and that is exactly what we intend to do with our 3D printer. Our main priority is to overcome all the technical challenges associated with this technique with trial and error.” kampc.be/innovatie/projecten/c3po


SBID shuns The Dorchester hotel over owner’s human rights policy The Society of British & International Design (SBID) has decided to relocate its International Design Awards and the 2020: Meet The Buyer events away from London’s The Dorchester hotel, which is owned by the Sultan of Brunei. “SBID do not support the law imposed in Brunei against the LGBT community,” the Society said in a statement. “As a standard-bearer organisation for the interior design industry, we believe in equality, diversity and as a business we actively promote best practice standards. Having reviewed venue choices for 2019 and in light of the ongoing human rights issues in Brunei, we have taken the decision to relocate away from The Dorchester.” SBID is keen to stress the decision is no refl ection on the operational staff working at the hotel. A new venue is yet to be fi nalised. sbid.org


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RIBA to open new learning centre The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced it will be opening a new learning space on 29 October 2019. The RIBA Clore Learning Centre is being created on the fourth fl oor of RIBA’s Grade II-listed building. The 365sq m space, designed by architects Hayhurst & Co, will be a destination for people of all ages to engage with architecture. “The RIBA has long understood the importance of helping everyone to engage with architecture and the built environment and the role they can play in shaping it. It’s great that our established learning programme, including workshops for children and adults, will be enhanced with this new dedicated learning space. We are enormously grateful to the Clore Duffi eld Foundation for their vision and generous grant which are making this possible,” says RIBA president Ben Derbyshire.


Regional house prices fall due to “lack of clarity” and uncertainty surrounding Brexit British estate agency Knight Frank has published its Prime Country House Index up to the end of Q1 2019. The report shows an increase in offers made and properties sold subject to contract. However, it also highlights a fall in property prices in regional markets throughout England and Wales, which were down by 0.8% over the fi rst three months of the year. “Recent performance in regional markets refl ects heightened political uncertainty surrounding the UK’s planned exit from the EU,” says Oliver Knight, associate at Knight Frank Residential Research. “A lack of clarity about the outcomes and timings has resulted in caution among some buyers and sellers in prime residential markets. Generally, more moderately priced properties have been resilient. Property worth up to £1 million fell by a relatively modest 0.7% annually, while £2 million-plus properties have fallen by an average of 2.5%.” knightfrank.co.uk/research


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