search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
BEST OF INDUSTRY @ WORK HELICOPTERS WORK TO SAVE AND SERVE By James Careless and Nada Marjanovich


It is widely realized that helicopters keep our citizens and communities safer. Here are two true stories that show how rotary-wing aircraft and their crews work to save and serve.


Saving Haitian Lives


For such a small nation, Haiti has been beset by enormous natural disasters. This year, Hurricane Matthew killed almost 900 Haitians. In 2010, the 7.0 earthquake that rocked the island nation killed 300,000. While such devastating events would challenge even the most developed countries, their impact is magnified in Haiti. The poorest country in the Americas, and one of the poorest in the world, is a place where vital services like health care are very difficult for many to access.


This is where Haiti Air Ambulance (HAA) enters. Established in 2014, the non-profit organization is the country’s first and only helicopter EMS (HEMS) program. HAA’s staff is composed of 12 Haitians and Americans, and a rotating team of volunteers. Air Methods is under contract to provide HAA with pilots, mechanics, and two Bell 407 helicopters. Everyone—and everything—works together to provide Haitians with an unprecedented level of HEMS.


After Hurricane Matthew ravaged the nation’s southwestern peninsula in October 2016, HAA


was the first of first responders on the scene. In addition to treating and transporting victims, their Bell 407s flew surveillance missions over the devastated region that had completely lost communication with the rest of the country. HAA’s primary HEMS mission was expanded to include ferrying medical personnel and supplies.


Unfortunately, Haiti’s cash-poor medical system lacks the depth, integration, and completeness of health care systems existing in the First World. “There are so many unforeseeables, and lots of unpredictability,” says Brandon Turman, a flight paramedic who volunteered with HAA after Hurricane Matthew. “There isn’t always a readily available receiving facility, and the nature of the call or the receiver can change midstream,” he says.


Rotary-wing lead pilot Robert Nelson is an Air Methods employee who has been flying for HAA since it launched in June 2014. “The hospitals aren’t integrated into a network the way they are in the U.S.,” says Nelson. This means that HAA’s comm personnel have to get involved at multiple points to get patients the care they need.


Jacquelin Petit, HAA flight EMT, has experienced


62


Nov/Dec 2016


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86