search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HAZARDOUS AREA


DELIVERING TO SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY EXPECTATIONS - EVEN IN CHALLENGING ENVIRONMENTS AND HAZARDOUS AREAS


BY DAVID PONCHON, TECHNICAL MANAGER AND JONATHAN PETIT, PRODUCT MANAGER, TRELLEBORG FLUID HANDLING SOLUTIONS


It is clear that, even though the worst of 2016 may be behind us, the oil industry has been, and needs to continue to be, adapting to a ‘new normal’ in terms of cost management. Recent research from DNV Gl reveals that 85% of oil and gas professionals have cost management as a top or high priority for 2017, and a majority (63%) see current cost-efficiency measures as marking a permanent shift towards leaner ways of working. Organisational restructuring (37%), reducing Opex (35%), and improving efficiency from existing assets (29%) are the top three priorities for cost control in 2017.


The aim for suppliers to the industry will be to ensure that these new opportunities continue to encompass best practices that have ensured safety, but also maximise efficiency. It is vital that this move towards rationalization does not come at the expense of the significant safety gains made in the last few years. This will require suppliers and customers alike to adapt their approaches to oil transfer to make sure that they are both safe and strategic when operating in hazardous areas.


Understanding the environment in which a hose will function is a crucial first step in ensuring safe hose management in hazardous


Below: Connection of REELINE hoses with hydraulic wrenches.


Above: two images: REELINE Submarine line.


areas. Suppliers know that equipment can be put to the test in extreme environments - OCIMf estimates that a floating hose string can be subjected to 30,000 wave cycles per day – and more in areas with challenging weather conditions. Extreme weather presents several obstacles: ice can potentially stop production equipment working, freeze personal protective gear or safety devices, or render a vessel unstable thus increasing risk of breakaway. Extreme wave and wind activity inflicts a significant strain on facilities and hoses, and can be particularly challenging to predict. Recent research from the Australian Maritime College has found that despite the probability, most platforms today are not designed for the decks being hit by a wave – highlighting the need for designers to plan for every eventuality.


The complexity and variety of these environmental considerations is why Trelleborg’s R&D department is involved as early as possible on any project. To accurately assess the impact of environmental and situational conditions, R&D teams typically use prototypes to undergo rigorous mechanical and chemical testing, and hydrodynamic analysis, to model hose behaviour allowing them to recommend the ideal product for each environment. This is the methodology used in projects that adhere to API 17K spec standards. This testing considers temperature, pressure, the type of product,


p36 | www.sosmagazine.biz | March 2017


as well as the wider environment to minimise risks in hazardous areas.


In most cases, the most suitable solution for non-harsh, low cost of extraction environments will be a single or double carcass nipple hose, such as Trelleborg’s SEAlINE offering. SEAlINE hose design consists of binding steel wires which are fixed on the nipple, using a standard metallic flange and pipe to connect with the hose body structure. High operational resistance is achieved using a perfect link and adhesion between hose body structure and flange. The advantage of such a configuration is the ubiquity of its application. Many sites around the world use this technology which is certified to GMPHOM 2009 guideline – the standard for offloading hoses. These are also often the most affordable solutions; they can withstand all but the most extreme environments with ease. Nipple hoses can be used in both floating and submarine offloading configurations.


In order to take a flexible approach and ensure the right solution is used, having a choice is vital. For extremely challenging environments or long service life, for example, more specialized solutions may be utilised. In this case, a nippleless technology may be required, such as Trelleborg’s TREllINE or KlElINE offerings. This technology means that there is a compact flange to increase the flexibility and the minimum bending radius (MBR) of the hose is decreased. This is


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52