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INDUSTRY NEWS ITF STEPS UP ACTION TO SOLVE COSTLY PIPE-WALKING PROBLEMS


The Industry Technology Facilitator (ITF) is welcoming additional participants to a new joint industry project (JIP) to develop pipeline anchoring and monitoring systems which could mitigate the risk of pipeline walking and cut pipeline anchor installation costs in half.


The Anchoring Pipeline Technology (APT) JIP currently involves Shell. The initial phase of the project will run for eight months and will bring together major global operators and pipeline installation companies to collaborate with ITF and Crondall Energy, an independent oil and gas consultancy. It aims to investigate alternative and less costly solutions and create a roadmap on how to manage and mitigate the pipe-walking challenge.


Pipe-walking, or axial ratcheting, has been observed on a number of pipelines and can cause integrity concerns, including very large global axial displacements of the pipeline. In some cases, this has resulted in tie-in connector failures or subsea intervention to mitigate or control high rates of walking.


large suction anchors, with a capacity of around 100 tonnes are typically installed at the end of the pipeline to control walking. In more recent projects, some long pipelines have required several anchors to be installed over the pipeline length.


The potential overall saving from the deployment of optimised distributed- anchoring systems is expected to be up to 50% of a typical installed cost. for example, this could result in a cost saving of more than USD5m for a project planning to install several anchors on a single long pipeline.


The study will complement existing research by using the extensive experience of JIP participants. It will provide design strategies to simplify the design process and present a roadmap for projects to manage and mitigate the walking challenge over the project cycle. This will include the development of a ‘wait and see’ approach based on effective monitoring of pipeline walking by applying mitigative measures only when and where they are required.


Crondall Energy will be exhibiting at the ITF Technology Showcase - Technology in Action at AECC in March. Now in its fourth year, the event brings together some of the brightest minds from inside and outside of oil and gas to challenge current thinking and bring fresh focus on progressing new solutions.


An Innovation hall will be dedicated to supporting the innovator community and showcasing the very best in new technologies, products, solutions and services. The technology sessions are facilitated by oil and gas operators with a keen interest on getting technology to market through the most effective and efficient routes possible. The three sessions this year will focus on:


• Applied Digital Technologies to Improve Operational Efficiency and Performance


• Transformational manufacturing and new materials to reduce costs


• Emerging Inspection and Condition Monitoring Technologies to Prevent Failure in Operation and Avoid Downtime


www.itfenergy.com OPEN DAY SUCCESS FOR HTL GROUP SCOTLAND


Controlled bolting specialist HTL Group Scotland has opened its doors to showcase their full suite of capabilities at their new facility in Dyce, Aberdeen.


The company welcomed visitors from a range of sectors to see the extensive group capabilities first hand including demonstrations of their core OEM products and Joint Integrity Software, an exclusive tour of the new facility and HTl’s brand new mobile exhibition, the HTL Expo Unit.


The opportunity to see the new facility and HTl’s OEM Controlled Bolting and Ancillary products on display offered attendee’s the chance to discover and learn more about the customer focused solutions available from the experienced and friendly team at HTl Group Scotland.


An insight into the ECITB Approved training offered by HTl Group Scotland also formed part of the busy day. The dedicated training centre within


p14 | www.sosmagazine.biz | March 2017


the facility allows for ECITB Approved MJI training to be delivered with fully equipped practical training rigs and premium quality classrooms for theory elements.


Marc Gerrard, Business Manager, HTl Group Scotland comments:


“With over 100 current and perspective clients passing through the doors, the event was a huge success for us, there was a genuine buzz about the facility all week! Many of our guests were only aware of a fraction of our capabilities and can see clearly where the HTl Group portfolio can add additional value to their business. I am confident to announce that with the tremendous attendance and feedback from the event, HTl GROUP SCOTlAND has arrived! ”


Stuart Broadley, CEO of The Energy Industries Council (EIC) (pictured top right) commented on the success of the day:


“Many thanks to HTL for inviting me


to the new facility’s opening event in Aberdeen. HTl Group is an extremely innovative bolting solutions OEM and the open day has been the ideal means to highlight this. By allowing visitors to see the complete range of solutions readily available whilst meeting the whole team, they have presented themselves as the hub to deliver the Group’s comprehensive capabilities in Scotland. We are delighted to have HTL as a global member of the Energy Industries Council (EIC).”


Due to its great success, the open day is planned to be one in a series of open door facility visits over 2017.


Below: HTl Group Scotland, Dyce, Aberdeen.


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