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CAMPAIGN GROUPS AND PAIRS 330 Five: Rear-Admiral H. H. Bousfield, Royal Navy


1914-15 STAR (Lieut. H. H. Bousfield. R.N.); BRITISH WAR AND VICTORY MEDALS (Lt. Commr. H. H. Bousfield. R.N.); JUBILEE 1935; CORONATION 1937, these unnamed, mounted as worn, nearly very fine and better (5)


£260-300


Henry Hugh Bousfield was born in Hoole, Cheshire on 30 November 1889. Appointed a Midshipman in the Royal Navy on 15 January 1906, he was promoted to Sub Lieutenant in March 1909, Lieutenant in June 1910 and Lieutenant-Commander in June 1918. Specialising in Navigation, he was Lieutenant on the light cruiser H.M.S. Skirmisher, 1913-17 and then on the battleship H.M.S. King George V, 1917-19. He qualified for staff duties in 1922, was promoted to Commander in 1924 and afterwards served on the staff of the Atlantic Fleet for two periods before and after commanding destroyer divisions in H.M.Ships Wryneck and Volunteer, 1926-28. In June 1931 he was promoted to Captain. Served as Senior Naval Officer, Yangtze, September 1931-October 1933. Captain of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, 1935-38. Captain of the cruiser H.M.S. Manchester, 1938-40. He was appointed to the staff of the C. in C. Mediterranean in 1940. Placed on the Retired List as Rear-Admiral in July 1941 he was immediately reappointed to serve as Captain in the Dover Command and later in command of the Dover Naval Station. He reverted to the Retired List in June 1946. Latterly living at Foxhold, Bucklebury Common, Bradfield, Reading. Rear-Admiral Bousfield died on 6 November 1947. With a quantity of copied research including service papers and copied photographs.


331


Nine: Chief Engineer Officer G. T. Beed, Merchant Navy, a veteran of the famous Greif action of February 1916, who was posthumously mentioned in despatches for the Sicily landings in July 1943


1914-15 STAR (Asst. Eng. G. T. Beed, R.N,R.); BRITISH WAR AND MERCANTILE MARINE WAR MEDALS 1914-18 (Eng. S. Lt. G. T. Beed, R.N.R); VICTORYMEDAL 1914-19 (Eng. S. Lt. G. T. Beed, R.N,R,), these with their original but damaged card boxes of issue; 1939-45 STAR; ATLANTIC STAR; AFRICA STAR; ITALY STAR;WARMEDAL 1939-45, M.I.D. oak leaf, good very fine and better (9)


£300-360


George Templeton Beed, who was born in Liverpool in February 1888, was commissioned as an Engineer Sub. Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Reserve in August 1915, in which same month he joined the armed merchant cruiser H.M.S. Andes. And he was similarly employed at the time of that ship’s action against the German raider Greif in February 1916, the same action that led to the loss of her consort, Alcantara. In fact, Beed remained in the Andes for the duration of the War, and returned to the Mercantile Marine in November 1918, when his R.N.R. commission was terminated.


With the renewal of hostilities, and by now a Chief Engineer Officer, Beed joined the R.F.A. tanker Ennerdale, which ship was converted to a landing ship for “Operation Husky” in July 1943, her gantries carrying eight landing craft and their crews. And of his subsequent fate on 13 July 1943, the following entry appears in the ship’s log: ‘This is to certify that Mr. G. T. Beed, Chief Engineer, whilst standing outside the port alleyway after port door of the midship accommodation during an air raid, was mortally wounded by fragmentation from a shell fired from one of the steamships, hitting and exploding on No. 8 port wing tank lid, a large piece of shrapnel passing through him. Medical assistance was obtained from H.M.S. Roberts almost immediately, but Mr. Beed died at 2005 hours and his body was landed to the Beach Casualty Station at Avola for burial.’


Beed was posthumously mentioned in despatches ‘for outstanding leadership and courage under heavy and sustained air attacks during the landings in Sicily’ (London Gazette 11 January 1944 refers). Aged 55 years, and the husband of Rita Beed of Buckhaven, Fife, he was buried in Syracuse War Cemetery, Sicily; sold with original Board of Trade communications regarding the recipient’s British War and Mercantile Marine War Medals, together with an extensive file of research.


332 Three: Clerk F. J. Ring, Adjutant General’s Office, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force


1914-15 STAR (Clerk F. J. Ring) renamed; BRITISH WAR AND VICTORY MEDALS (Clerk F. J. Ring, A.G’s Office M.E.F.) nearly extremely fine, scarce (3)


£100-140 333 Four: Acting Serjeant R. H. Gill, King’s Royal Rifle Corps - who was awarded the Military Medal


1914-15 STAR ((A-3060 L. Cpl., K.R. Rif. C.); BRITISHWAR AND VICTORYMEDALS (A-3060 A. Sjt., K.R. Rif. C.); FRANCE, MEDAILLE MILITAIRE, silver, gilt and enamel, enamel loss to reverse, generally good very fine except where stated (8)


£200-260


M.M. Edinburgh Gazette 20 November 1916. ‘A.3060 Actg. Sjt. R. H. Gill, K.R. Rif. C.’ Medaille Militaire London Gazette 14 July 1917. ‘A.3060 Acting Serjeant Rupert Hartley Gill, King’s Royal Rifle Corps’. Citation for the M.M. as listed in The King’s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle 1916:


‘A.3060 A-Sergeant Rupert Gill. After all the officers of his company were killed or wounded, continued to lead his men up to the German trench, where they were received with showers of bombs. Many of these bombs he hurled back into the German trench, and continued doing so until he received a painful wound in the hand. After having this wound dressed he returned to the German trench, and was dangerously wounded there.’


Acting Serjeant Gill, 9th Battalion K.R.R.C. earned the M.M. at Delville Wood, 24 August 1916, being twice wounded in the action, as related above.


Sold with a Royal Life Saving Society Medal, bronze, reverse inscribed, ‘R. H. Gill, Oct. 1907’ and two ‘L. A. O. Sandow’s Exercise’ Crosses, bronze, unnamed; with metal badge. With copied research.


334


Three: Able Seaman W. Baker, Royal Navy, who was captured at Kut, 29 April 1916 and who died as a prisoner-of- war of the Turks, 27 August 1916


1914-15 STAR (189328 A.B., R.N.); BRITISH WAR AND VICTORY MEDALS (189328 A.B., R.N.); MEMORIAL PLAQUE (Walter Baker) extremely fine (4)


£200-260


Walter Baker was born in Hale, Surrey on 25 June 1878. A Labourer by occupation, he enlisted into the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class on 8 July 1896, being advanced to Boy 1st Class in October 1896. He was promoted to Ordinary Seaman in October 1896 when on Curacoa and to Able Seaman in January 1899 when on Venus. When serving on Eclipse on 3 February 1906, he jumped overboard to the assistance of Able Seaman William A. Kingham, R.N. He was not able to save Kingham from drowning but his gallantry was commended by a subsequent Court of Enquiry. Able Seaman Baker was discharged as time expired on 3 July 1908 and joined the Portsmouth R.F.R. He was recalled to the Service on 2 August 1914. He served on Edgar, August-December 1914; Victory I, December 1914-March 1915; and then on Clio, April-November 1915. In September 1915, whilst serving on Clio in the Persian Gulf, he was wounded in action. Able Seaman Baker was captured by the Turks at Kut on 29 April 1916. As a prisoner-of-war he died of malaria on 27 August 1916.


With copied service paper. Medals mounted in a scuffed 26 x 26cm. glazed frame which also contains a photograph of Baker. The Memorial Plaque is contained in a separate similar sized frame.


www.dnw.co.uk


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