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PHOTO: JON D. KENNEDY


“IT WAS JUST OBVIOUS AT THE TIME THAT SHE WAS SUPER INTELLIGENT, SHE UNDERSTOOD PROCESS – WHICH IS KEY, IN


MY MIND – AND IT’S JUST KIND OF LIKE SHE GOT IT. IN A VERY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME, SHE UNDERSTOOD WHAT WE WERE TRYING TO DO AND HOW IN THE WORLD WE WERE GOING TO GET IT DONE.”


—DON HOLMAN,


CORPORATE DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, TYSON FOODS


Hare (second from top right) with some of the 40 Under 40 Council members in 2012


Hare has done in that arena. “It was obvious that at some point


she was going to be a leader,” he said. “I think she’s done a nice job, and it looks like she’s changing some things with the Safety Council. I think she’s into it, and that’s always good.” Holman has kept up with Hare’s


work at CalArk through his friend Dennis Hilton, the company’s vice pres- ident of safety, and says the same traits he noticed during her internship are the ones that have made her successful in her current position. “I appreciate what she’s done in the


industry and the leadership role she’s taken,” he said. “I think she’s a great young leader in transportation safety.” Hare grew up in Siloam Springs


and that’s where her parents, Steve and Paula Still, live. Her father, a contractor, may help explain why Iseler’s approach to learning regulations may have worked so well with Hare. “If someone asks my father to build


an engine for something, it may be something he’s never done in his life but he’ll get a book out and he’ll do it to


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the best of his ability. He won’t be sat- isfied until he knows the job is done right.” Just about four years ago, she mar-


ried Chris Hare, whom she’d met some years before through mutual friends. A program manager for the rotorcraft division of Triumph, she said it was his support, trust and respect that tipped the scales from friendship to love. They live in Benton and both work long hours, so when they have time together it’s spent focused on his sons Connor and Ethan, aged 6 and 11, when they’re around, and each other when they aren’t. She said travel is one of their favorite things, whether it’s to the Virgin Islands (their favorite destination so far) or Beale Street in Memphis. Even though she knows she’s


earned respect among her industry peers and higher-ups, there are times when being a young woman still makes Hare feel a bit out of place, though she’s always game to take on challenging situations. Such as the time she was invited to provide a training session for the Texas Department of Public Safety,


and expected to be talking to small group. “When I walked into that facil-


ity, I saw more than 100 officers,” she recalled. “And here I am a 27-year-old girl speaking about electronic logging and how it’s better for our country. At first I was a little nervous, it was a lot bigger scale than I thought.” But she’s long been accustomed to


public speaking and making presenta- tions, so she got through the training with no problem. And as it happened, not long after that a CalArk driver told her about being stopped by a Texas DPS officer. The officer mentioned to the driver he’d met his director of safety and heard about the electronic logging devices. When the driver asked if he wanted to see the electronic logging data, the officer told him, “If you have to deal with her, I know you’re doing it right,” and sent him on his way. One of the driver’s first calls was to Hare. “He said, ‘You got me a quick roadside inspection today!’” she said.


ARKANSAS TRUCKING REPORT | Issue 1 2014


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