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TRADITIONAL GAP YEARS ARE BEING PUT ON HOLD IN FAVOUR OF A WORKING YEAR AFTER UNIVERSITY


Traditional gap years once considered rites of passage for most students are now being reconsidered in favour of working gap years abroad after university says LoveTEFL.


The growing trend for students taking a gap year after their A-Levels has been reported to have declined after universities started charging up to £9000 per year for tuition fees in 2012.


Although gap years were once deemed as an excuse to ‘drop out’ for a year, many students and their parents are now no longer in the position to support a year of backpacks and beaches. Therefore, many students are now considering putting off their gap year until after university as a way of building skills and experience.


For Ian O’Sullivan, Recruitment Manager of LoveTEFL, the trend is not surprising. He said: “Although most students would love to have the option to travel before university many are concerned about the costs involved and whether a traditional gap year is actually a viable option before embarking on their university studies.


“As we recruit LoveTEFL candidates for teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL)


placements abroad this year, we are witnessing many of our applicants are graduates looking to take a working post gap year in order to travel, expand their horizons and get some real work experience and transferable skills under their belt whilst they weigh up their future options.”


“Many graduates feel a working post gap year abroad will be of more benefit to them than a traditional gap year – and as they struggle to find employment in the current climate they hope a gap year after university be that vital ingredient to make them stand out against other candidates when they return home looking for work.


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