This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE - MRO


BY ELI NAVON PHOTO: SPC ROLAND HALE


Vibration: Less Is Better


THE HELICOPTER IS REALLY A BUNCH OF PARTS FLYING IN RELATIVELY CLOSE FORMATION. THINGS WORK WELL UNTIL ONE OF THE PARTS BREAKS FORMATION. VIBRATIONS ARE ONE OF THE BIGGEST ENEMIES TO HELICOPTER HEALTH CONDITION. IT IS GENERALLY ACCEPTED THAT LESS VIBRATION IS BETTER THAN MORE VIBRATION.


From decades of operating rotary wing


aircraft, military organizations around the world, as well as many civil manufacturers and operators of helicopters, have learned that one of the biggest enemies to sustained normal safety and flight operations is high vibrations throughout the drive train, rotors and fuselage. Component failure, imbalances in the


drive train, uneven friction, and the uneven meshing of gear teeth, cause such vibrations. Rotary wing operators worldwide have borne the costs of dynamic component fail- ure due to damaging vibrations, long before predicted time before overhaul (TBO). “Vibration causes an unplanned acceler-


ated reduction of the airframes useful life thereby increasing operating and support (O&S) costs and decreasing both aircraft availability, safety of flight, and logistics sup- portability,” Says Eli Navon CEO of Shake’d Technologies a New York based company specializing in solving helicopter vibration challenges. It has been observed that safety-related


problems in various parts of the aircraft have arisen from vibration causes: cracked welds, cracked fuselages, loose wiring connections, and in-flight failure of dynamic compo- nents. Attempts within the industry to


27 ROTORCRAFTPRO.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52