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Wire-strikes are just one of a pilot’s nightmares. Photo: Dana Maxfield


AN AVERAGE OF 65 WIRE STRIKES OCCUR EACH YEAR, WITH NEARLY 30 PERCENT OF THOSE INCIDENTS RESULTING IN A FATALITY.


per minute) and In-flight icing. It’s no secret that we spend most of our careers in the


wire-strike environment. In fact, it is estimated by some that we spend 90 percent of our flying in this environment found at less than 1,000 ft. AGL (above ground level). Thousands of new wires and towers are popping up annu- ally. And if that doesn’t get your attention hopefully this will! An average of 65 wire strikes occur each year, with nearly 30 percent of those incidents resulting in a fatality. Add night conditions or IMC (instrument meteorological conditions), or near IMC, and the chances of a fatality


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occurring increases to an alarming 60 percent. Moving on to more nightmares, low-rotor RPM is


about as popular with helicopter pilots as low airspeed is with our fixed-wing brethren. If immediate AND correct response to a low-rotor RPM situation isn’t applied, the results will be disastrous. Unlike an airplane, once our rotor blade(s) is fully stalled there is no recovery! In an autorotation consider this: a low airspeed may not neces- sarily hurt you but a low-rotor RPM encounter to the point where the airfoil is no longer producing lift and you can count on an unfavorable outcome. So, which one are


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