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Contributors


Molly O’Neill is the former food columnist for The New York Times Magazine and was the host of the PBS series Great Food. Her work has appeared in many national magazines. She is the author of a memoir, Mostly True, and four cookbooks: One Big Table: A Portrait of American Cooking, A Well-Seasoned Appetite, The Pleasure of Your Company, and the award-winning New York Cookbook. She divides her time between New York City and upstate New York.


DB Rudin (who writes the column “Creature Feature”) is an environmental education consultant, elementary school teacher, and the Education Coordinator at Venetucci Farm, an 190-acre his- toric farm in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He offers programs through Colorado Critter Encoun- ters, which includes hands-on programs for kids on nature and conservation, and a class for those who tend the soil, The Good, the Bad and the Beautiful: Bugs 101 for Gardeners. http://www.cocritterencounters.com


Larry Stebbins (who wrote the “Growing Locally” column in this issue and a book review) is the founder and director of Pikes Peak Urban Gardens, a botanist, retired science teacher and has over 40 years experience as a biodynamic and organic gardener.


J.D. Smith (third from left) has received a Fellowship in Poetry from the United States National Endowment for the Arts, and his third collection, Labor Day at Venice Beach, is forthcoming in 2012. Smith’s first essay collection, Dowsing and Science, was recently published by Texas Review Press, listed in The Huffington Post as one of the United States’ “fifteen feisty indepeden- dent publishers.” He provides periodic updates at http://jdsmithwriter.blogspot.com


At age 20, Cynthia Rosi (who wrote “Tuscan Roots”) emigrated from Seattle to London, deter- mined to write for a living and to marry the Anglo-Italian boy she’d met at a bus-stop during a University exchange program. They spent many happy summers in Tuscany, and Cynthia loved apprenticing in her husband’s aunt’s kitchen. Her daughter has followed in those footsteps, and learned last summer how to make homemade ravioli. Aunty Mabu inspired Cynthia’s garden, her flock of chickens, and her best meals. Cynthia blogs at http://www.simplyhugyourself.com


Michael A. Stusser (who wrote “Garden Club”) is a Seattle-based freelance writer and game inventor. His first book, The Dead Guy Interviews: Conversations with 45 of the Most Accom- plished, Notorious, and Deceased Personalities in History (Penguin Publishing) was released to critical acclaim in 2008. Stusser is a columnist for mental_floss magazine and his work is


frequently published by Yoga International, Seattle Weekly, and the New York Times Syndicate.


Eva Syrovy (who wrote the essay for this issue’s “Top Dressing”) is an immigrant from the Czech Republic who has been a daughter and mother (two boys, one grown), an oil field “frack rat” and teacher, a diligent runner and cyclist, a lazy gardener, a decent cook and quilter, and a lousy housekeeper. Her writing, about the kids she mothers and teaches, history, and the envi- ronment, has been most regularly published in the Colorado Springs Business Journal and The Denver Post.


6 Winter/Spring 2012 greenwomanmagazine.com


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