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Making your home suitable for renewable technologies


Renewable technologies are currently hot news but before you rush to see how much energy they can help you can save, heat pump manufacturer Mitsubishi Electric has some timely advice.


“Before even thinking of what renewable technology such as air source heat pumps can do to lower your fuel bills, you need to look at how effi cient your home actually is,” says John Kellett, General Manager of the company’s domestic heating systems division. “There is no point in getting a highly effi cient heating system if you haven’t insulated your loft or have draughty windows and doors.” Even in older buildings, improvements in insulation


can often be achieved simply and cost effectively and can make a real difference to energy bills and use. “Ensuring the fabric of your home is as energy effi cient


as possible is what we call a LEAN approach and this should be followed by being MEAN – monitoring your energy use and fi nding ways of minimising it or using it more effi ciently,” he adds. “Only then should you consider step three, which is the use of GREEN technologies.”


Changing your existing heating for more modern,


energy effi cient renewable equipment such as air source heat pumps can be an especially effective way of lowering your energy use and saving money. “By adopting a lean, mean and green approach, every


home has the potential to reduce its carbon footprint and lower energy bills, but it’s important to get the order right before you invest in low carbon technology.” Mitsubishi Electric manufacturers the award-winning air source heat pump in the UK and has


Ecodan®


developed a self-learning control system and a British- built cylinder to ease installation.


Further information and a list of accredited local installers can be found on the company’s website www.domesticheating.mitsubishielectric.co.uk.


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