This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
24—MARYLEBONE JOURNAL


CULTURE


WATER MUSIC


Shannon Denny meets Danielle Eubank, the American painter whose paintings of water from her epic adventure circumnavigating Africa in an ancient vessel are showing in Marylebone


Water is a handy substance made from two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen. It covers well over half the Earth’s surface and a human body needs around two litres of the stuff per day. When the summer skies open up to dump quantities of raindrops on us unsuspecting Londoners, it’s easy to forget that in some parts of the world this life- giving liquid – especially the clean, fresh kind – is in notably short supply. For LA-based artist Danielle


Eubank, though, water is constantly in the thoughts. Known for her contemplative waterscapes, Danielle says her affinity is thanks to a California upbringing. “I grew up on the coast, so I’ve always had a very


close relationship with water, and of course water is a very important topic in California. It’s always on people’s minds.” In spite of its extensive coastline, shortages are common throughout the state, so residents get plenty of experience in water rationing. “Talking about water, conservation and the environment is permanently ingrained in the culture where I’m from.” She’s enjoyed an exceptional


opportunity to appreciate the stuff at close range over the past two years, having served as expedition artist for an unusual sea voyage. Inspired by the claim of the ancient Greek historian Herodotus that a group of Phoenician mariners were the first to achieve a circumnavigation of Africa in 600BC, former British Royal Navy officer Philip Beale set out to recreate their sailing vessel and journey. As captain of Phoenicia, he invited Danielle to join the adventure.


The 20,000 mile voyage started


in Syria in August 2008, continued through the Suez Canal, around the Cape of Good Hope, through the Straits of Gibraltar, and ended back in Syria in October 2010. Danielle’s role was similar to that of an artist in residence, although the residence in question was in constant motion. The capacity of the boat was


about 16, but at any given time there were around a dozen individuals on board. Danielle’s tours of duty lasted about three weeks at a stretch, and in addition to recording and visually describing the journey she also served as crew member and adhered to the shift system of four hours on, four hours off, four hours on, six hours off and six hours on. At the outset, the list of potential challenges ranged from piracy in the notorious Gulf of Aden to rough seas along the devastating Skeleton Coast, not to mention day-to-day trials like


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100