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rotor and tail rotor configuration he made a key feature of Sikorsky designs (Spenser, 1998). In reality no one person invented the helicopter. There were many hard earned developments which led to the helicopter becoming a reality in Europe and the United States in the late 1930s and early 1940s. However, Igor Sikorsky certainly played a pivotal role in all of this by developing the first successful North American helicopter, cultivating the single main rotor con-


REFERENCES


Dealer, F. J. (1969). Igor Sikorsky His Three Careers in Aviation. New York: Dodd, Mead and Company. Sikorsky, S. I. (2007). The Sikorsky Legacy. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing.


Spenser, J. P. (1998). Whirlybirds: A History of the U.S. Helicopter Pioneers. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.


figuration that has become the most common configuration in subsequent helicopter designs and making significant advances in helicopter technology. The company he found- ed continues to carry on his trademarks of innovation and performance with current models such as the S-76, S-92, S-70 Hawk series and the X-2. His legacy as a great aero- nautical engineer and leader in helicopter development make him a true Rotorcraft Pioneer. abcd


LT Brad McNally is a 2001graduate of the United States Coast Guard Academy. After serving two tours in Coast Guard Naval Engineering he attended Naval Flight Training in Pensacola, Florida. He was previously station at the Coast Guard Air Station in Atlantic City, NJ


where he was an aircraft commander in the MH-65C Dolphin helicopter. He currently resides in


West Lafayette, IN with his wife Monica and son Brett where he is assigned as a graduate student at Purdue University pursuing a Masters Degree in Aeronautical Engineering.


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