This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
RWANDA: 20 YEARS ON


Opposite page: Tea plantations in Rwanda; Top: A Rwandan woman returning to Mayange Village, also known as the village of returnees that came back to Rwanda after the 1994 genocide; Bottom: Colorful hillside homes in Kigali


• Establishing political stability, pub- lic administration and service delivery; • Kick starting and reviving the economy; • Apprehending the suspects, rec- onciling victims and perpetrators; and • Securing internal security of persons and their property as well as guarding national borders from infiltration by the perpetrators. •


an entire population traumatized and in displacement with more than three million refugees in the neighbouring states and border areas. The economy was at a standstill, and most of the infrastructure had been destroyed. Yet for the people that survived – both the perpetrators and the victims had to live side by side in a


country that was seemingly beyond repair.


The challenges of national reconstruction, social healing, rehabilitation and reconciliation were unprecedented and each one of them was urgent, important and a priority. Addressing the multiple priorities involved:


The new Rwandan leadership embarked on an approach that was seen as radical and unprecedented at the time. It entailed a zeal and charisma, characterized by politics of inclusion, power sharing and seeking consensus in decision making. Where applicable, conventional methodology was followed but unconventional logic also came handy in form of home grown solutions in addressing a myriad of specific problems. Support from the international community was at first lukewarm, given the scepticism surrounding


the new government. However, it soon changed and the acquired international support helped a great deal in the post-conflict recovery process.


Inclusive governance More than three million Rwandan refugees were repatriated, and together with those in internal displacement, were resettled. Over 12,000 genocide suspects had been apprehended, and were released to undergo the Gacaca process – a homegrown system borrowed and modernized from the ancient Rwandan culture, which simultaneously pursues justice with reconciliation.


In terms of governance and democratization, Rwanda’s post- genocide leadership ushered in political stability by defining itself as an inclusive governance that is committed to reversing the negative politics of exclusion, discrimination, ideologically charged ethnic and


The Parliamentarian | 2014: Issue Three | 155


©Goran Bogicevic/Shutterstock.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84