This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PROFILE D


on Snodgrass was going through his desk drawers in March, throwing away junk and packing up stuff he wanted to keep in advance of his


company’s move to its new facility. This led him to fi nd a couple of relics from a wildly circuitous global aviation career path that took him from a farm south of Dallas all the way back to … well, a metal building south of Dallas.


Snodgrass, president of Dallas Aeronautical


Services (DAS), tossed a couple of old, yellowed and wrinkled clip-on company ID badges onto the conference table. One was from a now- defunct aviation repair company in nearby Grand Prairie, where 24 years ago he worked on the re-skinning of a by-then-already-ancient Douglas DC-8’s fl ight controls. The other was from an aviation composite components repair shop, also now defunct, in Wichita, KS, where after only two months on the job — at age 21 — he was named general manager. Since then he has had a number of other career stops in places like Oklahoma City; Munich, Germany; Prestwick, Scotland; Lisbon, Portugal; and El Salvador. Ten years ago, feeling the need to be closer to home, Snodgrass returned to the Dallas area and set up shop as a consultant. He advised international airlines, corporate aircraft fl eet operators and repair shops around the world on both the science and the art of fi xing and, when necessary, making composite aircraft parts. He didn’t plan on opening his own aircraft repair station. However, his understanding of composites was in high demand, and he had developed solid business management skills along the way, so the notion of actually opening up his own shop would not go away. Still, the idea of having to beat the bushes to fi nd aircraft in need of repair, especially with his kind of expertise, was not at all appealing.


DonSnodgrass


President of Dallas Aeronautical Services By Marj Rose


05 2014 6


DOMmagazine


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64