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PROVISIONS


Below is a summary of provisions in the OSHA Proposed Rule 29 CFR 1910.1053.


Exposure assessment


• Employer shall determine exposure of all employees exposed above action level.


• Each job classification and shift shall be sampled but employer may use representative samples (highest expected exposure) if several employees perform same job.


• Existing sampling data may be used for initial monitoring if taken less than 12 months before effective date.


• Employer may use objective data that demonstrates exposures above action level are not possible.


• Periodic monitoring every 6 months for employees above action level but below PEL.


• Periodic monitoring every 3 months for employees above PEL.


• There is a performance option that allows use of any combination of air sampling and objective data to assess 8 hour TWA exposure.


• Current sampling methods can be used (no need for new pumps), but employer must use an analytical lab that meets rigorous quality control performance standards.


• Employees must be notified of assess- ment results and receive an explana- tion of corrective action if above PEL.


• Employees or representative must be allowed to observe monitoring.


Regulated areas and access control: For areas where exposure is or can be expected to be above the PEL, the employer must either establish a regulated area or use an access control plan.


• Regulated areas must be demarcated and access must be limited to autho- rized employees.


• Respirators must be used in regulated areas.


• If clothing may become “grossly con- taminated with finely divided material containing crystalline silica” employer must provide protective clothing or means to clean it and ensure that clothing is changed or cleaned. The “grossly contaminated” phrase is not defined or explained.


• The written access control plan option requires a competent person and is similar to the regulated area concept but seems to be more suited to intermittent exposure scenarios similar


to construction environments. It requires demarcation, respirators and protective clothing if it can become “grossly contaminated.”


Methods of compliance


• Engineering controls must be used even if not able to reduce exposures below the PEL. There is no allowance for a phase-in period or for respirator use in certain exposures or industries.


• Accumulations of crystalline silica must be removed by (Continued on p. 44)


November 2013 MODERN CASTING | 43


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