This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
control, methods of compliance, medical surveillance, hazard communication and training, recordkeeping and dates. Te current deadline for submitting com- ments is Dec. 11, if it is not extended. As the proposed rule stands, met-


alcasters should be aware of certain changes in compliance requirements. Several provisions are included in the proposed standard beyond a lowered PEL, including:


• Measuring the amount of silica workers are exposed to above an action level of 25 µg/cu.m;


• Protecting workers from respirable crystalline silica exposures above the PEL of 50 µg/cu.m on average over an 8-hour day;


• Limiting workers’ access to areas where they may be exposed above the PEL;


• Using dust controls to protect


workers from silica exposures above the PEL;


• Providing respirators to workers when dust controls cannot limit exposures to the PEL;


• Offering medical exams, includ- ing chest X-rays and lung function tests, every three years for workers exposed above the PEL for 30 or more days each year;


• Keeping records of workers’ silica exposure and medical exams. See the sidebar for a more complete


list of provisions. Based on industry input, OSHA


has made some adjustments to the language of the standard in the last couple of years, including basing the standard on current sampling technol- ogy so a new method or procedure will not have to be tested, vetted and learned. Additionally, OSHA agreed to begin medical surveillance of PEL after 30 days, every three years, avoid- ing unnecessary testing costs on indi- viduals who do not remain employed at a plant for more than a month.


Road to Compliance In its argument for the feasibility


of the proposed rule, OSHA points to a few case studies of metalcast- ing plants reducing silica exposure. Te results are case by case and may or may not apply to other plants. Metalcasters will find it most cost effective to first identify the source of silica dust before implement- ing control measures that may or may not achieve full compliance. OSHA cites potential methods such as adding enclosures or ventilation, fixing leaks in sand mixers, replacing existing equipment with completely enclosed or pneumatic sand equip- ment, improved work practices and housekeeping, or substituting silica for an alternate granular media, such as olivine sand, which is currently in extremely low supply in the U.S. Once the final rule is published, the standard will become effective after 60 days. All obligations set in the rule are required to commence 180 days after the effective date except for engineering controls and laboratory requirements, which are required after a full year. See www.afsinc.org/silica for more information.


42 | MODERN CASTING November 2013


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196