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Authors


Authors


Nigel Eastman is Professor Emeritus of Law and Ethics in Psychiatry in the University of London and an Honorary Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist in the National Health Service. Alongside his medical training he was called to the Bar, in Gray’s Inn, in 1976. He has carried out research and published widely on the relationship between law and psychiatry, whilst also having nearly 30 years experience of clinical forensic psychiatry. He has extensive experience of acting as an expert witness in both criminal and civil proceedings, in England and Wales and in the jurisdictions of other countries. Tis includes 20 years experience of assessing ‘death row’ cases for the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. Much of his work has been concerned with matters of public policy and, for example, he has given evidence to Parliamentary Select Committees on law and psychiatry. He advised the Law Commission during its work towards reforming the partial defence to murder of ‘diminished responsibility’ and later lectured to all ‘murder ticket’ judges on the new statutory provisions, for the Judicial Studies Board. Professor Eastman is an expert Member of the Foreign Secretary’s International Death Penalty Panel. He is a founder member of Forensic Psychiatry Chambers.


Tim Green is a Chartered Clinical Psychologist employed as Head of Psychological and Talking Terapies in Forensic Services of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. He is also an Honorary Researcher in the Psychology Department at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. He has extensive experience in preparing reports for a number of different Courts, both civil and criminal, including experience offering oral testimony and experience of offering opinion in murder trials, including assessments of inmates on death row in the Caribbean in cases of appeal before the Privy Council.


Richard Latham is a Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist in the National Health Service. He works with offenders with both mental illness and learning disability. In addition to his medical training he holds a Masters degree in Mental Health Law, and his thesis focused on the use of mental health expert evidence. He has substantial experience of acting as an expert witness in criminal and civil proceedings, including preparing reports in capital cases in East Africa and the Caribbean. He is a founder member of Forensic Psychiatry Chambers.


Marc Lyall is a Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist in the East End of London. He has specialist accreditation in both General and Forensic Psychiatry and extensive experience of acting as an expert witness in both civil and criminal cases. In addition he holds a Master degree in Mental Health Law. He is a founder member of Forensic Psychiatry Chambers. He has prepared psychiatric reports in capital cases both in Africa and the Caribbean


About Forensic Psychiatry Chambers: Forensic Psychiatry Chambers comprises 10 consultant forensic psychiatrists, all working otherwise within the NHS, and was formed to pursue legally informed and ethical forensic psychiatric practice in the provision of legal services to the courts. It attempts to achieve this through a ‘collegiate’ approach to practice, including through rigorous peer review of past cases. It is committed to enhancing the quality of practice both ‘within itself ’ and through offering tailor, made training programmes. It is also committed to provision of ‘pro bono’ services for humanitarian purposes, and several members of Chambers have undertaken assessments of ‘death row’ cases in jurisdictions which utilise the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.


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