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T H E L I B E R A L A RT S I N AC T I O N From the start, Mount Holyoke has distinguished itself by reimagin-


ing women’s lives and their role in the world. Liberal arts education here has never been a matter of pure intellectual inquiry for its own sake; rather, there has always been a pull toward employing that education for some larger, public purpose. For the past two years, the College’s 18th president, Lynn Pasquerella


’80, has led a strategic planning process that has examined the College’s mission and strengths in the context of global economic challenges and national debates about the value of a college education.


As recent research has confirmed, a liberal arts education remains


the best foundation for the changing world of work. It introduces students to multiple perspectives and develops their own independent critical judgment. It compels them to think and perform challenging intellectual tasks, sometimes outside their own comfort zones. It gives them new perspectives to ponder and often leads them to question their preexisting ideas and beliefs. This is precisely why it is an ideal education to prepare students to function in a diverse and rapidly changing work environment.


The best preparation for a career, no matter what that career, is a liberal arts education. In a world that is increasingly globally interdependent and where rapidly changing


technology means rapid obsolescence, this is the best preparation we can offer students. —P R E S I D E N T L Y N N PA S Q U E R E L L A ’ 8 0


Left to right: Julia Frankenbach ’13, awarded Beinecke Scholarship to study land use in Northern California; Natasha Naidoo ’12, Ph.D. candidate, molecular cell biology, University of California, Berkeley; Annakate Schatz ’14, will likely major in chemistry or math, track athlete; Allyson Chew ’13, MHC/Alliance Program intern, Shanghai, China; Kristina Bolten ’12, politics major, MHC Summer Intensive Language Program, Beijing, China; Varuna Nangia ’14, will likely major in psychology, rock climber


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