This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Peacock Gap debuted in 1957.


exclaims Lewis. “Sausalito used to be the coolest little town in the ‘50s and going into the ‘60s, and then it got overrun and turned into Lahaina for a minute. Now it’s becoming revital- ized with new restaurants and a new scene, and it’s actually becoming more of a town now.” Among his favorites: Poggio, the Blue Rock in Larkspur, and the venerable Marin Joes in Corte Madera. I would add a couple of my own tips, if you’re anywhere near Novato, Marvins—consis- tently voted best breakfast in Marin—and Boca. Also, if you ever get


a chance, check out jazz singer Wanda Stafford, who’s been playing gigs in


Alister MacKenzie’s Meadow Club is amongst the best walking courses in the world.


Rafael mayor, John McIn- nis, contains a double deck driving range, nine-hole executive course, practice center, batting cages and a restaurant that always seems to be jumping. As for Marin’s private


courses, Meadow Club is an Alister MacKenzie design that dates back to 1926. “It’s a treasure,” proclaims Lewis, who’s been a longtime Meadow Club member. “Maybe the one thing that keeps Meadow from being a Crystal Downs, is that it has side-by-side adjoin- ing fairways—but that’s exactly what makes it so fabulous to walk! In terms of walking a golf course, I don’t think it gets any better in the world.” The other private operation, Marin Country Club, built in 1959, was updated by the late John Harbottle just a


few years ago. Set in a highly upscale residential neighborhood, it is the embodiment of a true club-like atmosphere, with a family sense, and a history of a younger, hipper, membership. Stories of its annual Carnavale costumed golf tournament are legendary throughout the county. But beyond golf,


Marin offers a myriad of other recreational choic- es including world-class hiking, dining, shop- ping, a vibrant live music scene, and a variety of outdoor activities. Bed and breakfasts abound, with Sausalito present- ing a solid handful of award-winning boutique hotels. “There’s a zillion great spots, the restau- rants are off the charts,”


Marin for years. And while many of the haunts and institutions of my youth are long gone—old timers will remember downtown San Rafael Macy’s, Las Gallinas driving range, the turtle races at Zack’s in Sausalito, King Cotton, Bergie’s, Nave Lanes, Shakey’s in Terra Linda, Village Music, George’s Pool Hall, Uncle Charlies and the Red Kettle—golf still remains a constant, and Marin prevails as one of the great places on earth. It’s fitting that a hippie-styled rainbow frames its entrance as you first cross over from the Golden Gate Bridge—because certainly for many Marinites, there is indeed a pot of gold at the other end.


Based in the Bay Area, Barry Salberg is a communications professional and freelance writer, with a wide range of media background, including byline credits in virtually every major golf publication.


Cozy accommodations at one of our two hotels packaged with golf, gaming and dining!


90 Minutes North of Sacramento Corning, Ca (530) 528-4600 www.rollinghillscasino.com


WINTER 2013 / NCGA.ORG / 41


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136