This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BY BARRY SALBERG The county north of San Francisco Bay is rich in golf and culture MARIN MARVELOUS


It’s simply one of the most eye-popping, exhilarating vistas on our planet. You drive south on 101, through the Waldo tunnel, and then suddenly it’s right there—San Francisco Bay, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the San Francisco city skyline in all its splendor. It’s a visual treat that those who commute from Marin get to enjoy on a daily basis. But then again, living in Marin is some- thing special unto itself.


K


nown for its liberal politics, affluence, iconic architecture and stunning scenic palette, Marin


is one of the oldest coun- ties in the state, consisting of 520,000 square miles, and a relatively few 258,000 residents. Often character- ized by a cultural mindset that’s a bit different from other places, it’s been cited


as having the fifth highest income per capital in the country, and has long been a haven for artists, entrepre- neurs, musicians, tradesmen, and various creative types. Mountain biking was said to have been invented in Marin on the slopes of Mt. Tamal- pais. George Lucas created Lucasfilm and Skywalker Ranch there, and used Fourth Street in downtown San Rafael for the cruising


scenes in American Grafifti. Nowadays, rockers like


the Grateful Dead, Grace Slick, Sammy Hagar and various others all reside in Marin County. Comedian Robin Williams grew up in Marin, so did singer, Huey Lewis—and so did I. Other than some occasional golf and a few high school reunions, my ties and trips to Marin over the years have been limited. So it was


NCGA Hall of Famers Sandy Tatum and Johnny Miller were involved in the creation of StoneTree GC.


38 / NCGA.ORG / WINTER 2013


The Golden Gate Bridge and Waldo Tunnel lead travelers into Marin County.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136