This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
www.greenbuildermag.com 08.2012


SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED – The Hands-On Handbook Continued from previous page 44 ESSENTIAL DETAIL Oil or Latex?


While the specifi cs of geography, dryniess of the wood and even the quality of the paint act as variables, researchers have studied the pros and cons of both kinds of paint on certain types of wood.


EXPERT ADVICE ~ How-to ~ MAKE HOUSE PAINT LAST


The Best Prep


When refi nishing exterior surfaces, here are some rough guidelines.


An interesting study comparing oil (alkyd) based and latex paints arrived at the following results:


“Smooth and rough (saw-textured) yellow-poplar and sweetgum plywood panels were exposed outdoors for 16 years near Madison, Wisconsin. The performance of several fi nishes was evaluated over a 12-year period, and the panels were evaluated for decay after 16 years. Oil or latex semi-transparent stain provided less than 5 years of service life. Nevertheless, the wood showed only minor decay after 16 years. In contrast, latex paint was in excellent condition after 12 years, but the wood showed considerable decay.”


Source: “Durability of yellow-poplar and sweetgum and service life of fi nishes after long-term exposure,” Williams, R Sam; Feist, William C., (Forest Products Journal, 2004)


1. First, all loose paint, dirt and rot must be removed; nailheads primed and puttied.


2. If you fi nd mold or mildew, treat the wood with a borate mixture.


3. The surface must be dry before recoating, but do not expose bare wood to sunlight. UV rays greatly decrease the ability of the surface to hold paint. One approach might be to hang a painter’s dropcloth over the surface while it dries.


4. Use sandpaper to roughen especially glossy areas. 5. Pre-coat knots with knot sealer or aluminum paint.


6. Remove old caulking around windows and doors, and replace it once the paint is dry.


7. Use a premium paint, even if it’s twice the cost, unless you want to do this job again soon.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76