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www.greenbuildermag.com 08.2012


SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED – The Hands-On Handbook Continued from previous page 32 12 ~ How-to ~ REPOINT OLD BRICK 13


Mist again. Dampen the surface once before you leave the job overnight. The moisture will help the mortar dry more evenly and stronger.


Wash off fi nal haze. The next day, scrub off any remaining haze, and you’re done.


COMMON ERROR Wash Those Tools


People not accustomed to working with mortar often assume they can leave mortar-covered tools overnight and wash them the next day. But mortar has some vicious chemical properties that make it almost impossible to remove after the fact. Clean tools thoroughly before the mortar sets, or you’ll be buying new ones.


ESSENTIAL DETAILS The Right Joint


Brick experts draw a clear line between good brick mortar joints and bad ones, especially when the masonry will be aff ected by weather. Certain joints, when exposed to rain, will create a place for water to collect and penetrate the semi-porous mortar. Over time, this can cause weakening, erosion, or, in the case of cold climates, damage from freeze-thaw cycles.


Concave joint (recommended) Tooling works mortar tight to produce a good weather joint.


“V” joint (recommended) This type of pressure also produces a good weather joint.


Struck joint (not recommended)


SOURCE: WWW.BUILDWITHBRICK.COM


Squeezed joint (not recommended)


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