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TECHNEWS IN ASSOCIATION WITH POINT BLANK’S PRODUCTION TIP OF THE WEEK LAYERED ORGANIC TEXTURES IN ABLETON LIVE


JONNY MILLER PUTS TOGETHER A MID-TEMPO SUMMER BEAT INSPIRED BY THE ORGANIC SOUNDS OF PRODUCERS SUCH AS JOHN TALABOT IN ABLETON LIVE


Point Blank Online School brings you weekly fresh nuggets of music production advice courtesy of the team of pro producer course developers and tutors… This week Jonny Miller (Sonarpilot Audio) takes the reigns:


“One of the things that can help your electronic music productions sound extra special these days is an injection of a more organic, human sound into the mix. For example, it may be Andre Lodemann’s beautiful acoustic piano lines sitting side by side with the stark electronics on his deep house classic track ‘You Never Know’.


“In a similar way, one of the main characteristics of the South African house music sound is the very real-sounding wooden percussion and shaker parts playing their part alongside groove and simplicity. Having something that sounds ‘real’ in your dance music productions can give it an edge in a world of ready to go computer music.


“One current electronic music producer that clearly adheres to this principle is John Talabot, whose recent tracks cover many a genre, always feel electronic but real at the same time. Just one example is his remix of Glasser’s ‘Learn’, where alongside an electronic arpeggio part, a rhythmic real sounding glockenspiel line plays, complete with subtle variations of tone, texture and depth over time.


“In this tutorial I showcase one of the recent additions to the Ableton Live partner instruments series, the Skiddaw Stones from Sonic Couture. Rather than using as standard synth sounds, I use the Skiddaw Stones to produce more organic sounding arpeggio parts.


“The story of the original Skiddaw Stones goes back hundreds of years. Carefully crafted from Hornfels rocks found in the Lake District back in 1827, each stone in the set of original Skiddaw Stones, known as the Richardson set after its maker, provides a perfectly pitched note when struck. Together, they form the most unique and maybe the oldest Lithophone instrument you’ll fi nd. Having been cared for over the years and kept safe in a museum in the north of England, these unique stones were


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