This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
News | EQUIPMENT


Interiors


built passenger ships German shipbuilder Meyer Werft contracted the Dutch deck specialist Bolidt Kunststoftoepassing BV to install decking on a 130,000gt passenger ship that was delivered last month from Meyer Werft’s Papenburg shipyard. The project saw the ship fitted with 15,500m2


of Bolidt material for


the outdoor decks. Te majority of the deck areas, as well as the


stairs and steps, have been covered using Bolidt’s environmentally friendly Bolideck Future Teak, a composite decking product that replicates the look and feel of traditional teak decks, but offers further benefits through reduced installation times and easier onboard maintenance. Other products used in the outdoor deck areas


include Bolideck Select Soſt, for some of the more colourful design features onboard, and Bolideck Select Hard for inside the pool wading areas. Bolidt has also supplied a special pool coating system and bespoke base design for the bottom of the pools. Te vessel also features more than 3400m2 deck coverings and in excess of 3500m2


of indoor of C-Rail


from Bolidt. Two further cruise vessels at Meyer Werſt due for


delivery this year will also feature Bolidt products. For Celebrity Reflection and AidaMar, the fiſth and sixth in their respective series, Bolidt is supplying all the outdoor decks using Future Teak, as well as Bolideck Select Soſt in colourful areas, while the balconies will feature Bolideck 525. www.bolidt.com


Bolidt installs decking on latest cruise ship from Meyer Werft.


Ballast water systems Dutch decks for German- OceanSaver supplies


Chinese shipyard Rongsheng Shipbuilding Heavy Industries has chosen the OceanSaver’s Mark II for two 317,000dwt VLCC newbuildings. The contract comes just weeks after DNV type


approval, certifying Mark II to fully meet the requirements of the International Ballast Water Convention, and previous system orders placed by Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Industry (China) and SPP Shipyard (Korea) for two suezmax and four bulk vessels. Scheduled for completion in June 2013, the


contract is valued at US$3 million and represents OceanSaver’s first VLCC system delivery for its new Mark II technology. The delivery covers the supply and installation of


two sets of Mark II


BWT units, granting ballast water flows at a rate of 6000m3


/hour.


www.oceansaver.no CAD/CAM


Dassault Systèmes opens


new horizons Dassault Systèmes has announced the pursuit of a new strategy based on a 3D Experience platform that will change the way industry leaders and marketers create value for their end consumers. Te 3D Experience platform transforms


the way “innovators will


innovate with consumers” by connecting designers, engineers, marketing managers and even consumers, in a new ‘social enterprise’. “We have evolved the V6 platform with our


customers over the last few years. The addition of intelligent information search-based technologies, social innovation capabilities and realistic 3D virtual experiences made us ready to pioneer a new technological wave: a 3D Experience platform to serve the social enterprise of the 21st century,” said Bernard Charlès, president and CEO, Dassault Systèmes. 3D Experience enables any enterprise stakeholder


to participate in the innovation process and to drive value for the end consumer. Monica Menghini, executive vice president, industry, marketing and corporate communications, said: “Our objective is to provide our clients with a powerful platform, which uses the universal language of 3D and the Web as the user interface, to help them to connect the dots for a game-changing increase in end-user value.” www.3ds.com


14 The Naval Architect March 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52