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E-flite’s


Cessna 150


aerobat 250


It’s been the mentor of thousands of pilots. Now it finds the same role as a quality 4-channel R/C park flyer.


PHOTOGRAPHY: FRANK FANELLI & JIM WIGGIN W


ithout any statistics to prove it, it wouldn’t be any stretch at all to say that a major percentage of general aviation pilots got


their wings because of the Cessna 150. Ac- cording to the free online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, almost 24,000 of the 150 models were manufactured, most in the U.S. but even some internationally. My own intro- duction to flight came through N4444V, a 1970s vintage Cessna 150L Commuter. Lots of stories to tell about that plane and I still wonder if it soldiers on until now. The airplane’s history is extensive and


there are still plenty of 150s around. They’ll probably rival the venerable Piper J-3 Cub for longevity. So it’s pretty apropos that E- flite has introduced its Cessna 150 Aerobat 250 in the guise of the 150 Aerobat that David Payne’s grandfather, Doug, owned and flew. David is one of the Horizon Hob- by’s model designers. The little E-flite Cess- na also served to introduce me to a much smaller micro class of radio gear that bears some comment later on. As usual with E-flite models the packag-


ing is very secure so the wood frame Cessna was in very good shape when it arrived. The dryness of winter did its usual magic, slight- ly shrinking the wood frame of the 150 so there were some covering bubbles that had to be dealt with. A little work with a cover-


30


ing iron at 275 degrees got rid of them, but some care was needed to make sure the wing and tail structures didn’t get warped from excessive shrinkage. This isn’t any fault of the airframe, it’s a function of weather. Except for the radio gear, power system,


and battery, the little Cessna is complete. Nothing to add. But some tools will be a must to put this 150 together. First, make sure you have a hemostat, or at least a tweezer with a bit of length. Some thread- lock should be handy as well. And you’ll need three different drill bits: a #56 (1mm), a 1⁄16 (1.5mm), and 5⁄64 (2mm). These may not be in every modeler’s shop or workroom, but they will speed up the process if you have them before you start. As with all the E-flite manuals there is a


list of all the other tools that will be used, but they’re more common and should be around already. Along with that the manu- al also spells out the required equipment and with this model there’s a choice of using either the Park 250 motor or the Park 280. The 280 has more oomph and is used with a 3-cell 480 Li-Po battery. Putting this plane together goes quickly.


In the space of a weekend’s time I had it all assembled and ready to fly. Thanks to the quality of the plane the work hit only a few snags. Very impressive was the fit of the “glass” pieces, the front windshield and the


By Frank Fanelli


AT A GLANCE Type:


Construction: Wing span: Wing area: Airfoil: Length: Weight:


Wing loading: Prop:


Motor: ESC:


Battery: Radio:


R/C sport scale balsa and ply 37.9 inches 196 sq. in. flat bottom 27.2 inches


13.1 ounces (as flown) 9.6 oz./sq.ft. GWS 7–3.5


250–280 brushless 10-amp


2S 430–3S 450 mAh Li-Po 4-channel,


Manufacturer:


DS 35 sub micro servos E-flite


Dist. by: Horizon Hobby 4105 Fieldstone Road, Champaign, IL 61822 217-352-1913


www.horizonhobby.com MAY 2012


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