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in the Rue Morgue’, an orangutan slits a couple of people’s throats. In ‘Tell-Tale Heart’, he cuts the guy up and puts him under the floor. There are definitely one or two moments in the film where you might have to look away.” Genre fans will also be happy to know McTeigue favors practical


effects over a strictly CGI approach. “Visual effects always work better if you start with a basis of practicality. It just makes it more believable, whether you are doing prosthetics or models, and then digitally enhancing it later. It seems to suit the film, the period and style, and what the story was about.” Poe afficianados will find references to many of the writer’s


stories over the course of the film’s running time, as McTeigue explains. In addition to the previously mentioned stories, “there’s ‘Pit and the Pendulum’, ‘Premature Burial’, ‘Cask of Amontillado’, and then we’ve thrown a few lines in that reference ‘Descent into the Maelstrom’, ‘Imp of the Perverse’, and ‘Fall of the House of Usher’... There are little Poe-isms sprinkled throughout the story.” In the end, both director and star walked away with a greater appreciation for the man they worked so hard to pay tribute to. Shares McTeigue, “My love of Poe is even greater than when I started. The guy is a genius and a real character as well. It is hard to believe that he fit everything into his forty years that he did. West Point, newspapers, starting his own book companies, traveling the country extensively. He really came from a troubled upbringing to become this unique genius.” Cusack’s final thoughts shed light on his love for a role he never dreamed he would have the chance to play. “I came out of it a little bit humbled and hopefully a little bit wiser. It was exhilarating. I miss playing him. I enjoyed it, but I can’t say it was someplace I would like to spend most of my time. He was not only the first literary rock star, but he was the first tragic rock star who died too soon, and I am happy I haven’t had to live his life.”


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