This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
II before attending Offi cer Candi- date School and were considered exceptional leaders.


Those who volunteered for the new ranger companies did so for a variety of reasons, includ- ing an increase in pay and rank, the desire to get a combat infantry badge, and the opportunity to make a coveted combat jump. Most were very eager to leave the calm of Fort Bragg and enter the action overseas.


The men received six


weeks of special advanced training in a remote area of Fort Benning, Ga. They under- went physical training; weapons training, including the use of enemy fi rearms; and survival training, among other skills.


“The training was rough, espe- cially for us because our company commander, [Army] Capt. Warren Allen, did not want us to fail because we were the only blacks,” says for- mer Army Staff Sgt. Herculano Dias of Savage, Md. “So consequently, we trained harder than anybody else [who] was there.”


Water training was especially dif-


fi cult for some, says former Army Sgt. David Clarke of Germantown, Wis. The problem: Many of the men didn’t know how to swim. In retrospect, “that should have been a prerequisite,” Clarke says. “They messed up bad on that one. I was a good swimmer, but some guys came close to drowning.” Upon completion of their train-


ing, the 2nd and 4th Ranger com- panies traveled by train to San Francisco. (The 1st Ranger Compa- ny was fl own directly to Korea, and the 3rd Ranger Company remained stateside to train others.) There the Rangers exchanged some weapons


Engaging the enemy When the 2nd and 4th Ranger companies fi - nally reached Korea Dec. 29, 1950, the war wasn’t going well for U.N. forces, which had withdrawn below the 38th parallel as a re- sult of an aggressive enemy off ense. The 4th Ranger Com- pany joined the 1st Cavalry Division at Kimpo air base


outside Seoul, and the 2nd Ranger as attached to the 7th


IMAGES: FROM THE US ARMY’S FIRST, LAST, AND ONLY ALL-BLACK RANGERS/ USED BY PERMISSION OF SAVAS BEATIE


outside Seoul, and the 2nd Ranger Company was attached to the 7th


FEBRUARY 2012 MILITARY OFFICER 61


and received winter clothing, which primarily consisted of inserts for their fi eld jackets. The bitterly cold


Infantry Division near Tan Yang. The 2nd Rangers — fresh and ready to go — were given the order to be moved up and deployed as quickly as possible to help reverse the Communist push. The 2nd Rangers participated in


weather in Korea and a lack of suffi - cient cold-weather gear would pose a serious problem for the Rangers in the months to come. “The weather in Korea was dif-


fi cult, the coldest I’ve experienced before or since,” says then-Master Sgt. James Monte, USA-Ret., of Columbus, Ga. “I remember we had these insoles in our boots that would get sweaty as you walked, and then they would freeze on you. It was terrible.”


their fi rst fi refi ght Jan. 7, 1951, just a week after arriving in Korea, when 20 North Korean guerillas encoun- tered a Ranger roadblock near the village of Changnim-ni during the night. The guerillas were repelled but returned with a larger force, at- tacking an aid station. The Rangers reacted swiftly, fi rst repelling and then hunting down the guerillas as they tried to escape. During the ac- tion, 50 North Koreans were killed, and the 2nd Rangers lost its fi rst man: Army Sgt.


(below) Members of the 2nd Rangers receive awards for their heroic actions in May 1951 on Hill 581. (above) Army Capt. Warren Allen trains Rangers on the use of bayonets in combat. (facing page) Members of the 2nd Ranger Infan- try Company gather aboard a ferry on San Francisco Bay in 1950.


[CONTINUES ON PAGE 79]


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104