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rapidfire


Wild and Free on the Mendocino Coast


The windswept Mendocino Coast is pure California. Highway 1 twists, turns, winds, and steeply climbs, then sharply descends. At every switchback, the road opens to vistas of waves crashing onto jagged rocks. Driving the Mendocino coast is half the fun. Here are some ideas for passing the time: Stroll through the postcard-perfect Victorian village of Mendocino. Stop to sample sweet lemon buttery jam, praline pecan sauce, or honey mustard at Mendo Jams (www.mendojams.com) on Main Street. Paddle along Big River or pedal along the old river-


front logging trail. Rent kayaks, canoes, and bikes at Catch A Canoe & Bicycle Too (www.catchacanoe.com). Spot migrating whales. At 115 feet, the historic


Point Arena Lighthouse (below, www.pointarenalight house.com) offers an ideal vantage point. Visit Bowling Ball Beach, named for hundreds of


perfectly round boulders that line the sand like a bi- zarre collection of dinosaur eggs. Stay at Mar Vista Cottages (www.marvistamendo


cino.com) in Anchor Bay, and find everything you need to vacation like it’s 1949: Adirondack chairs, woodstoves, and percolator coffee. Innkeepers former Army CWO Tom Dorn and his wife, Renata, offer guests just-laid eggs and fresh veggies from their garden. Sup at Ravens’


(www.ravensrestau rant.com) an award-


winning and romantic fine-dining restaurant famous for its innovative vegetarian cuisine. Toast a perfect day with a cold beer at Pier Chow- der House & Tap Room (www.thepierchowderhouse .com) on the Point Arena wharf. Its outdoor patio is a picturesque location to watch the sunset. — Maryann Hammers


In Review


Battlefield Angels: Sav- ing Lives Under Enemy Fire From Valley Forge to Afghanistan. By Scott McGaugh. Osprey Publishing, 2011. $24.95. ISBN 978-1- 84908-515-1.


Heroism


on a battle- fi eld is not limited to those service- members


who kill the most enemy but is shared also by the Army medics and Navy corpsmen who save lives in combat.


This book is a long-


overdue tribute to the military medical person- nel — men, women, doc- tors, surgeons, nurses, medics, corpsmen, and medical specialists — whose “greatest medical tools may have been their courage, compassion, per- severance, and ingenuity” in caring for casualties on land and at sea. Author Scott McGaugh describes the develop- ment of battlefi eld medi- cine from the American Revolution to Iraq and Afghanistan today, from breakthroughs in hygiene, fi rst aid, and casualty evac- uation to the creation of plasma, sulfa drugs, anti- biotics, and forward-based mobile surgical teams.


He also highlights the


courage and selfl ess de- votion of physicians like Jonathan Letterman, “a pioneer of combat medi- cine,” nurse Jane Kendeigh at Iwo Jima, and numerous Medal of Honor recipients.


Sun Tzu at Gettysburg: Ancient Military Wisdom in the Modern World. By Bevin Alexander. W.W. Norton & Co., 2011. $26.95. ISBN 978- 0-393-07813-8.


Carl von Clause-


witz gets too much credit for


his military theories in


his book On War (1832); it is Chinese theorist Sun Tzu whose classic essays on the conduct of war — The Art of War, written 2,400 years ago — truly af- fect modern warfare. Acclaimed historian


Bevin Alexander examines Sun Tzu’s maxims in 10 battles and campaigns, from Saratoga in 1777 to Inchon in 1950, cleverly explain- ing how battlefi eld com- manders either successfully applied the maxims or di- sastrously ignored them. Alexander suggests Sun


Tzu’s maxims are surpris- ingly simple and logical, but he says many military lead- ers fail to understand them or they disregard them. — William D. Bushnell


*online: MOAA compiles lists of military travel deals and discounts at www.moaa.org/traveloffers. 26 MILITARY OFFICER FEBRUARY 2012


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK


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