This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Channel16 COMMUNITY | EDITORIAL | CONTRIBUTORS | WATERLINES COMMUNITY RE: “PERFECT YOUR HIGH ANGLE FORWARD STROKE.”


“BY ALL MEANS LEARN IT, USE IT, BUT DON’T BE DOGMATIZED.” From a comment posted on Adventurekayakmag.com by JAY COLEMAN


Georgian Bay Storm Gathering PHOTO: VIRGINIA MARSHALL


SPECIAL EXPEDITION ISSUE WWW.ADVENTUREKAYAKMAG.COM THE KAYAK TOURING MAGAZINE


BOAT TESTS DELTA 16 and STELLAR ADVANTAGE S16


PEER REVIEW SIX EXPERTS PERFECT YOUR FORWARD STROKE


EXPEDITIONS AROUND ELLESMERE ISLAND, STILL ON p.22


SURVIVAL


SHARK! WHY THE ODDS ARE IN YOUR FAVOR


FASHION


DOES THIS PFD MAKE ME


LOOK FAT? BY ALEX MATTHEWS


DISPLAY UNTIL AUGUST 30, 2011 $5.95 VOL 11 ISSUE 2 EARLY SUMMER 2011


EXPEDITIONS YOUR GUIDE TO START PACKING. GO NOW.


EXPEDITIONS OF THE YEAR • MUST HAVE SAFETY GEAR BEST TRIPS NOT DONE• HOW TO SURVIVE YOUR BUDDIES


STOP DREAMING.


Go Out and Play


THE NOT-SO-SCARY WORLD OF ROUGH


WATER KAYAKING By David Johnston


Not So Fast We knew the high angle forward stroke would be a controversial topic, but your comments on Adventurekayakmag.com to BCU coach Doug Cooper’s technique article “Get High, Go Fast” (Early Summer 2011, www.adventu- rekayakmag.com/0015) were more cautionary than critical. “Doesn’t the appropriate stroke depend on your paddle?” observed a well- informed DonP. “High and low angle Euro, wing and Greenland paddles work with differ- ent techniques.” A safety conscious Jay Cole- man warned, “No doubt a strong case can be made for the speed and efficiency of the high angle stroke, but caution dictates that paddlers be mindful of the shoulder and back problems this technique can engender.”


Keep ‘Em Laughing Mixed in with this issue’s gorgeous photos and practical techniques is a feature story called “Play Time” (page 31). It guides serious kay- akers through a series of silly challenges and games, because we know why you paddle, you remind us time and again. Writes Doug Lloyd of Victoria, B.C., “Fun is why we older, kelp- head sea kayakers appreciate Adventure Kayak magazine—there’s a youthful spontaneity that rejuvenates as we read, there’s your cheeky edge


8 ADVENTURE KAYAK | SUMMER/FALL 2011


and a Canuck-based wit that can’t be dupli- cated anywhere else. Alex Matthews cracks me up so hard sometimes that I swear I’ll rupture something important. I love you guys. I ap- preciate your efforts to educate, entertain and enthrall. Keep up the great work.”


Potty Poem Megan Gamble gets our vote for raunchiest paddling poem with her magnum opus, When I Fart in My Wetsuit. An excerpt: “Then something wafted up from the cockpit of my boat / I suppressed the gag reflex that arose in my throat / That neoprene’s porous and it let things pass / Especially when it comes to my gas.” Seven additional stanzas have been edited for space and graphic content.


Your Must-Have Skills For over a decade, Adventure Kayak writers have been teaching sea kayaking’s most impor- tant skills and strokes. Find them all at www. adventurekayak.com/0016. When we polled


readers and fans on Facebook, rolls and res- cues ranked predictably high on the list of must-have skills: “A variety of rescues, solo and assisted—as many as possible,” wrote Debo- rah De Lorenzo. Andrew Harris advocated the combat roll, “Once you have a strong roll, get to the beach and practice your roll in the surf.” Also popular were an effective forward stroke—“What do you use [the most]?” asked Sheila Porteous—and common sense, or “not getting yourself into dumb predicaments,” as Roger Botting put it. Practical ladies Birgit Kuhle and Melanie Buckle voted for,


re-


spectively, edging and bracing—“With a good brace, you stay on the right side of the water!” Follow their advice and flip to page 23 to learn sculling braces.


Event Planner Join Adventure Kayak on the water (and under it) at the 2nd annual Ontario Greenland Camp near Bracebridge, September 9–11 (www.on- tariogreenlandcamp.com). Next month, we hit the rough waters near Parry Sound, On-


Plus


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56