This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CONSTRUCTION PREFABRICATION


The Shard in London, currently under construction, has a range of prefabricated building features


But what has changed is that contractors and developers are now seeking to maximise its use on projects. ‘People are starting to see how much they


can prefabricate. The cost effectiveness is getting better and there’s more scope to widen the amount of prefabrication you use, especially if you can infl uence the early design of the building,’ says Pennell. But he adds: ‘There always seems to be a shortage of skilled people to deliver these new buildings. People are thinking about it more because of these drivers.’


The problem is that people can’t work out the real value of off-site prefabrication


Future growth Paul Edwards, head of sustainability at another major developer, Hammerson, also predicts a rise in the use of prefabrication. ‘We’re not doing it at the moment because there’s no [new] construction going on in our world, but that doesn’t mean we won’t be in the future,’ he says. ‘We are interested in it and have looked at


it several times for different reasons. I think it is something we’ll get involved in,’ says Edwards, who emphasises the benefi t of reduced site waste, which will become more important as landfi ll costs rise: ‘Waste is going to cost a lot of money.’ Speed of construction, more consistent


build quality and improved safety are also cited by Edwards as reasons for


Case study Modular corridors fi tted to new hospital


NG Bailey is supplying 500 prefabricated, multi-service corridor modules to the site of the new Aberdeen Royal Infi rmary, currently under construction. Each module is 50 to 60 feet long and comprises a steel frame with services running through it. The modules arrive with pieces


of partition wall or ceiling already attached, which further reduces the number of trades working on the site. ‘This way, the quality is guaranteed. You don’t have a contractor who is responsible for services blaming the facade contractor if it’s not built correctly,’ says Steve Parr, NG Bailey’s business transformation and supply chain director, who is responsible for managing its off-site business. The modules are manufactured


24 CIBSE Journal June 2011


at NG Bailey’s factory in Oakenshaw, Bradford. Building services engineers working with this form of prefabrication need to design their systems with production in mind, says Parr, with pipework and cables routed in alignment with the modules. The infi rmary’s plant rooms are also being built off site. This level of prefabrication


demands that detailed designs are agreed before work begins – something Parr describes as a whole new way of thinking for the industry: ‘Many projects kick off with the designs not complete and things are done on the hoof. If you’re designing for off-site manufacture, things have to be done up front. It’s a completely different behaviour and process.’


A computer image of Aberdeen Royal Infi rmary, which uses modular construction


www.cibsejournal.com


BDP


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72