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lavatory system that uses photovolta- ic cells integrated into the top of the lavatory. The cells convert either nor- mal restroom lighting or day lighting into energy that is stored and used to power valves and sensors in the hand- washing fixtures. These fixtures eliminate the need for batteries and electrical hookups, thereby cutting operating costs and the excess of used batteries sent to landfills. Handsfree. Capacitive sensing


technology eliminates the sensor windows on faucets that can be punc- tured, cracked or gunked up with soap scum. While these new faucets are known for their attractive curves, they are also highly vandal resistant and water efficient. The spout of a capacitive sensing faucet serves as an omni-directional sensor that is set off by any angle of approach, so users are less frustrated and maintenance has fewer headaches. Further, infrared sensors save


water by ensuring that water is only running while someone is washing hands. Metered faucets have a flow rate limit of 0.25 gallons per cycle (gpc), which is the amount of water used during each activation. Infrared activation can be used to


control water at peak times, saving scarce resources and reducing utility charges. Depending on local codes, water used by lavatories varies from 2.5 gallons per minute to 2.2 gpm, with many public restrooms using just 0.5 gpm. Hand dryers. Hand dryers, paper


towel dispensers and soap dispensers also come in touchless models. Newer models of hand dryers use 80 percent less electricity than other dry- ers, while drying hands in as little as 10 seconds, about three times faster than most other models. This saves money on electricity, hand towels, labor costs for ordering, storing, replenishing dispensers, collecting and disposing of paper towels. That’s not to mention the environmental benefits of conserving resources and eliminating excess paper waste. The bottom line: It pays to specify


restroom furnishings and fixtures designed to keep a restroom attrac- tive, in good working order and resis- tant to wear and tear and vandalism. Initially, it may cost more to choose


Plumbing Engineer


superior and durable products, but they pay dividends in the long run. n


Kris Alderson is a senior market-


ing manager for Bradley Corporation of Menomonee Falls, Wis., a USGBC member and manu- facturer of locker room products,


plumbing fixtures, washroom acces- sories, partitions and emergency fix- tures. She can be reached at Bradley Corp., W142 N9101 Fountain Blvd., Menomonee Falls, WI, 53052-0309. For more information, call 800/BRADLEY or visit www.bradley corp.com.


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