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The Climate Week Awards celebrate the UK’s most innovative, effective, and ambitious organisations, communities and individuals and their outstanding efforts to combat climate change.


The awards were judged by a star panel including Lord Nicholas Stern (author of the Stern Report), Mary Robinson (the former President of Ireland), best-selling author Ian McEwan, environmental campaigner Tony Juniper, eco adventurer David de Rothschild, Eden Project founder Tim Smit, Met Office Chief Scientist Julia Slingo, and Terry Tamminen, advisor on climate change to Arnold Schwarzenegger, Climate Week CEO Kevin Steele, Lucy Neville-Rolfe, Executive Director, Tesco, and Martin Lawrence, Managing Director, EDF Energy.


THE CLIMATE WEEK WINNERS Best Initiative by a Governmental or Statutory Body (in association with Tesco) Department for International Development - Scuba Rice Flood-resistant “scuba” rice, that can survive for two weeks underwater, is protecting the lives of millions at risk from climate change. Rising sea levels and storms are forecast to cause a 15% drop in rice production in developing countries. That could spell disaster for the one-fifth of the world’s population dependant on rice. The International Research Rice Institute, funded by the Department for International Development, isolated a gene for flood resistance and transferred it into rice. In a trial in Bangladesh, 95% of scuba plants recovered after flooding compared to just 12% for a traditional variety. Local farmer Mohammad Shahidul Islam said it was, “like magic”. http://tinyurl.com/65jpd88


Best New Product (in association with Tesco) Vegware - Compostable Packaging Vegware is the only UK company to supply cafés and shops with disposable cups, cutlery and packaging made of compostable vegetable material. While they look like their plastic counterparts and cost the same, there is a huge difference in environmental impact. Plastic is difficult to recycle when contaminated with food, so most goes to landfill. Vegware can just be binned with all other food waste and composted into fertiliser and biogas fuel. In 2010, Vegware’s customers saved 110 tonnes of carbon and 99 tonnes of virgin materials by using its products. The company runs a network to help its customers compost all their organic waste. http://www.vegware. com/


Best Artistic Response (in association with Tesco) Red Redemption - Fate of the World The computer game Fate of the World requires you to manage the earth’s food, water, energy and forests, while dealing with a growing population and threats from floods and extreme weather. Red Redemption raised £1 million for this follow-up to their BBC Climate Challenge.


Their team has producers, writers and composers whose previous credits include James Bond and Dr Who. Released in February 2011, the game’s scenario spans the next two centuries and puts all of our futures in your hands. It uses the latest scientific data and the team included Oxford University climate scientist Myles Allen. The New York Times said, “While ‘Fate of the World’ arms you with environmental data and renewable energy policies rather than grenades and rocket launchers, the result is still compelling”.


Most Inspirational Leader (in association with Tesco) Garry Charnock


Garry Charnock was the driving force behind the social experiment to mobilise the Cheshire village of Ashton Hayes to become the UK’s first carbon-neutral community. In the first year, its carbon footprint was cut by 20%. Garry went on to secure £750,000 of funding, including £100,000 to power the primary school and part of the village using solar energy and combined heat and power. He made a film about the project and represented the UK at the Live Earth concert, which broadcast Ashton Hayes’ successes around the world. He also spoke about it to 120 communities across the UK. More recently, he co-founded the charity Carbon Leapfrog. http://www. goingcarbonneutral.co.uk/


Best Technological Breakthrough (in association with Tesco) Xeros - The Virtually Waterless Cleaning System Yorkshire Company Xeros has developed a new way to clean clothes using hardly any water – a “game- changing” technology. Their prototype washing machine uses polymer beads which absorb dirt into their molecular structure and work for hundreds of washes. It requires 90% less water than conventional machines, and saves energy because there is less water to heat and the clothes are easier to dry. The independent Hohenstein Institute confirmed that it cleans as well as normal washers and environmental consultancy URS found its carbon footprint to be 20% lower. The company has raised £5 million to put a machine for the commercial laundry industry onto the market in 2011, with a domestic machine planned for 2013. http://tinyurl.com/64r7ogw


Best Initiative by a Small or Medium-Sized Business (in association with RBS) Continental Clothing Company - EarthPositive Apparel Continental Clothing, a supplier of blank cotton T-shirts and sweatshirts for fashion brands and corporate use, has established a blueprint for low carbon fashion. The maker of this year’s official Climate Week T-shirt has spent two years developing its EarthPositive range which has a carbon footprint 90% lower than conventionally- produced clothing. Continental analysed and improved every stage of its production process. The clothing uses organic cotton and is made using electricity generated solely from wind power. It is transported without using air freight, with 100% biodegradeable and recycled packaging. Continental’s factory in India treats waste

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