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Natural light fills the elegant master bedroom, through the enhanced dormers and windows.


 


Flawless Execution
Completing the bungalow project fulfilled O’Very’s ongoing commitment to make renovations look like other homes in the area—without looking like additions.


“This remodel brought great value to the house,” O’Very says. “It added more square feet, and it’s still a classy old house.”


Oozing with sentimental value, the house was actually purchased by Hutchinson’s great grandfather in 1925 for $5,000. At that time, the patriarch financed the deal at $40 per month for ten years. The home has been in the family ever since, and Hutchinson purchased it from his dad in 1998.


The 2004 renovations added some 900 square feet at a cost of $167 per square foot. According to Schwemmer, the total remodeling investment of $160,000 has increased the home’s value to an estimated $350,000.


Schwemmer says Utah has its own interpretation of the East Coast bungalow style. “This house is a hybrid, but it’s mostly a bungalow,” she says.


Schwemmer is quick to point out that the inviting second story can function independently as a retreat space, with its spacious elegant bedroom, walk-in closet, tiled bathroom with Kohler spa steam shower, office and sitting area, and deck. A unique design feature is the easily moveable bookshelf that conceals the bathroom entry, and when pulled open, serves as a pass through to the second upper floor bedroom, which is currently being used as an office.


Hutchinson selected Bellawood prefinished hardwood and slate to adorn all the remodeled and new floors.


Tucking the second story into the attic space and enhancing it with a number of small dormers preserved the scale and character of the home’s exterior and the neighborhood, Schwemmer adds. That step, in concert with the resulting varied ceiling heights, adds a harmonious uniqueness to the interior of the addition.

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