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PAGE 21: Paulette DeHart marks a map with string showing where her students come from. FAR LEFT: DeHart greets Jasper Jackson, one of the literacy students she works with. Nearly one-fourth of the adult population in Georgia is classified as illiterate. LEFT: Just in Georgia, more than 5,500 stu- dents from 88 countries are taught to read and write English each year by literacy ministry volunteers. BELOW: Students like Ming Yang from China need to be able to speak and read English in order to find work in the U.S.


illiterate Spanish-speaking persons how to read and write in Spanish so they can read the Bible in their “heart” language.


Paulette says her greatest joy is to see a student not only learn English, but to receive the Lord—stu- dents like 28-year-old Christelle Tcha Tcha, who was born on the Ivory Coast of Africa and spent 10 years living in France before coming to Atlanta. “Since I was a little girl, I like to speak English, learn English. And I like this country, too. So I say, ‘Okay, why not come here to maybe improve my English and that’s why I came here,” says Christelle in her rudimentary English.


Paulette said Christelle had a “hunger, a real hunger” for the Lord and during the prayer request time during one of her English classes, Christelle wrote on an index card, “I want to receive God in my life because I know it’s not easy to follow Him, but I really want to. . .


“I always have joy in my heart now, and I don’t know why I’m so very happy to know Him,” says Christelle. “Seriously, it’s amazing.” OM


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ON MISSION 23


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