This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
✓ Keep key stakeholders informed. This will include clients, investors, supporters, staff, and family. Appoint one person to be responsible for keeping contact with each major audience and business unit.

✓ Perform a post crisis evaluation. This will identify improvements in the process for future reference.

As a former broadcast journalist now providing clients with communications advice, I have been on both sides of the microphone in crisis situations. My experiences have shown that it will hurt more if you stick your head in the sand when the media are calling about an issue, regardless of whether you are guilty or innocent. If reporters are not afforded the opportunity to

get your side of the story to even try to balance out accusations, then you will have no chance at shaping the coverage. The issue will continue to build. And in crisis situations, silence is not golden. Silence is most often translated by the public into a feeling that you’re guilty and hiding. A well trained and experienced spokesperson can provide answers to the reporter and give the

March 2010 | Politics 45

public a chance to not only hear your message but also let them see how it is delivered. Is the message sincere, is it believable? An interview also affords an opportunity to challenge any reporter’s precon- ceptions that could be based on poor research, ru- mour, or critic spin.

2010 has not been a banner year so far in crisis management. If your organization finds itself in an unwanted crisis, remember to get out in front of the issue quickly and honestly. Prevent others from filling the gaps and spinning the case against you. Avoid the mistakes made by Tiger, Toyota and Adam Giambrone.

Scott Brownrigg has 20 years of experience working as a broad- cast journalist, political advisor, and communications strategist. He is a senior communications consultant at Sussex Strategy Group and can be reached at sbrownrigg@sussex-strategy.com. Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com