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Feature 2 | AsiA-PAcific
Kawasaki delivers LNG vessel to joint
owners
Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation has successfully delivered liquefied
natural gas (LNG) carrier Taitar No. 2 to her international joint owners;
Japan-based Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) Line and Mitsui & Co Ltd and
Taiwan-based CPC Corporation – also known as NiMiC.
T
aitar No. 2 is the second in a
series of four LNG carriers to
be delivered from the Sakaide
shipyard of Kawasaki Shipbuilding
Corporation. The vessel was delivered on
29 December 2009. Sister vessel Taitar
No. 4 is still under construction at the
yard. Taitar 1 and Taitar 3 were built at
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries shipyard in
Nagasaki and delivered in October 2009
and January 2010 respectively.
Taitar No. 2 has four Moss spherical
tanks that hold a total of 145,364m³ of
LNG. It also features excellent thermal
insulation performance with the Kawasaki
panel system, which achieves a boil-off
rate of 0.15% per day. The cargo tanks are
protected against direct damage by double Taitar No.2 built by Kawasaki shipbuilding corporation (credit: Kawasaki shipbuilding
hulls and double bottoms. corporation/NYK Line/Mitsui & co Ltd/cPc corporation).
Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation
has fitted the LNG vessels with Kawasaki
UA-400 steam turbines. The full power 26,900kW at 80rpm. This power is enough control system (IMCS) that monitors and
that this main engine gives to the vessels is for the ship to perform all necessary jobs, controls the cargo-handling operations
by keeping the gas in low temperatures, and and engine conditions. These superior
gives a speed of about 19.5kts (maximum) operability features were all adopted at
TechNicaL parTicuLars and 17.9kts (cruising), which is very the suggestion of ship operators during
Taitar No.2 good for this kind of vessel. In spite of the the development stage.
Length, oa .......................................289.50m already high power that this vessel has, Taitar No.2 is the 11th in a line of
Length, bp .......................................277.00m the auxiliary diesel generators add nearly 145,000m³ LNG carriers built by Kawasaki
Beam .......................................................49m 3600kW to the whole power of the vessel, Shipbuilding Corporation.
Depth ......................................................27m which is used mostly for manoeuvring, Once Taitar No. 4 is complete all of the
Design, draught ................................11.90m bow thrusters, and electricity on board. The vessels will be deployed for shipment of
cargo capacity ...........................145,364m³ auxiliary diesel generators are also able to about 3 million tonnes of LNG from Qatar
(at -163°c, 98.5%) offer emergency power for the system for to Taiwan under long-term contracts of
Deadweight ............................77,089tonnes freezing gas into the tanks. 23 to 24 years each. The vessels are jointly
Gross tonnage ......................118,634tonnes The 289.50m loa LNG vessel includes owned by CPC (45%), NYK (27.5%) and
propulsion ................................ 1 x Kawasaki a computer-controlled navigation system Mitsui (27.5%).
ua-400 steam turbine integrated into the wheelhouse to improve Demand for clean-energy LNG has been
Tank types ....................................Moss type operability and a 360degree view window increasing in response to environmental
Main propulsion power ................26,900kW that enables single-operator ocean-going concerns. NYK, Mitsui and CPC continue
service speed ........................ about 19.5kts navigation. to provide the relevant services that
Classification society ......................class NK The control room, positioned for the best meet the expanding demand for the
Flag.................................................. panama view of the cargo areas, is also equipped stable, economical marine transportation
with an integrated monitoring and of LNG. OMT
24 Offshore Marine Technology 1st Quarter 2010
Kawasai delivers LNG.indd 24 27/01/2010 14:10:21
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