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22


MOVING TOWARDS A CLIMATE NEUTRAL UN


In support of this effort a guide to sustainable travel in the UN is planned for release in spring 2010 and a help desk was established to assist UN organizations in develop- ing sustainable travel strategies. The Inter-Agency Travel Network (IATN) is also reviewing how sustainable travel can be supported through information exchange on best practices, standard requirements on travel agents, and possibly revision of existing travel regulations.


The GHG inventories show that organizations with significant field operations tend to have larger ve- hicle fleets and a high proportion of emissions from vehicles, compared to other organizations. Organiza- tions with large vehicle fleets are working to reduce emissions from ground transport: WHO and WFP, for instance, are increasing the share of hybrid vehicles in their fleets. UNWRA and several other organizations are including fuel efficiency as a criterion in procure- ment of new vehicles. The UN Web Buy site (the pro- curement portal developed by UNOPS and accessible by all UN agencies) now includes such information for all listed vehicles. WFP is also training all its drivers in fuel-efficient driving, and monitoring the fuel con- sumption of each vehicle.


Sustainable commuting is supported by a number of organizations. Examples range from providing staff


with subsidized tickets for local transport and electric chargers for electric scooters to reserving parking space for car pools. Several organizations have increased the parking area available for bicycles.


Emissions reduction in buildings Buildings are another major source of GHG emissions in the UN. Emissions are typically caused by electricity and fuel use for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, and powering of office equipment, and refrigerants used to cool the buildings.


Several new buildings or renovation projects undertak- en in the past two years have paid attention to energy efficiency and associated GHG emissions reductions. Examples include: The renovation of the UN Secretariat in New York (the Capital Master Plan), where an improved building en- velope, improved chillers and smart building features, such as daylight harvesting and occupancy sensors, are estimated to achieve approximately 45 per cent reduction in energy use. (see text box below). The new UNON/UNEP office building in Nairobi, which is set to become the first energy-neutral office building in Africa. The Green One UN House in Hanoi, created under the Delivering as One UN reform, where state-of-the-art





• •


UN Headquarters in NY: Capital Master Plan


When the original UN Headquarters complex in New York City (UNHQ) was built in 1952, it was considered one of the most modern facilities in the world. Today, the facility must meet new challenges and requirements. To bring the UN Head- quarters into compliance with current codes and standards, the UN Secretary-General proposed a comprehensive renova- tion of the complex, known as the Capital Master Plan (CMP).


Under the CMP, the UN intends to renovate the complex and upgrade all major building systems including the elec- trical, plumbing, fire suppression, heating and air-condi- tioning systems, and to reinforce the structural integrity of the building and remove all asbestos.


Renovation of the UNHQ complex will allow application of latest environmental technologies and highest energy-effi- ciency standards. The environmental performance of UNHQ is expected to progress significantly. Compared to the exist- ing campus, the following improvements are expected:


Energy At least 50 per cent reduction of total energy use; At least 65 per cent reduction of energy for heating and cooling;


1. 2.


Greenhouse gases At least 45 per cent reduction in CO2


3. emissions related


4. 5.


6. 7. 8.


9.


10. 11.


to total energy consumption (23’000 tonnes emissions); Removal of ozone-depleting refrigerants (CFCs); Use of reduced GHG HVAC coolants;


Water


40 per cent reduction in water use; Low-flow lavatories, toilets fixtures and urinals; Rainwater harvesting;


Resources and waste Removal of hazardous materials; Construction waste management programme; Use of recycled materials;


Energy savings are achieved through improved insulation and enhanced energy conservation. A high performance double-glazed curtain wall, automated interior shades/ blinds and other energy-conserving measures systems will be installed on roofs and exterior walls. A daylight harvest- ing system, which automatically controls artificial light in response to natural light levels, high-efficiency lamps and ballasts, and occupancy sensors, which automatically turn off lights if a space is unoccupied further decrease the building’s energy demand.


The renovation will also demonstrate new technologies, including photovoltaic roof panels.


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