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The Royal Institution of Naval Architects In Association with Middle East Workboats 2009


Workboat Powering and Propulsion Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre


Under the Patronage of His Highness Sheikh Hamdan Bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Minister of Public Works and Chairman of the National Transport Authority.


6 October 2009 First Notice & Call for Papers


The term ‘workboats’ encompasses a wide range of vessels working in a huge variety of roles including:


Tugs Salvage vessels


Anchor handling vessels Pilot boats


Coastguard vessels Patrol boats


Dredgers


Offshore support vessels Coastal crew vessels Diving vessels


Emergency service vessels Security and safety vessels


Economic and environmental concerns demand ever greater efficiency from all types of workboat. Such improvements in efficiency will come from powering and propulsion. The Middle East Workboats conference will bring together international designers, builders, equipment suppliers and operators to present and discuss the challenges faced by this sector of the maritime industry.


RINA invites papers on all aspects of the powering and propulsion systems of workboats, including:


• Powering – all engine types and power generation systems • Power transmission systems – direct and indirect • Design and implementation of propellers, impellers & thrusters • Steering gear • Dynamic positioning and trim & stability systems whilst underway


 I would like to offer a paper and attach a synopsis of no more than 250 words by 17/04/2009  I wish to receive details on exhibition space and sponsorship opportunities  I would like to receive a full programme brochure and registration form


Name:


Company: Address:


Telephone: Email:


Postcode: Fax:


(WB2009)


Please return to: Conference Department, RINA, 10 Upper Belgrave Street, London SW1X 8BQ by fax on +44 (0)20 7259 5912 or by email: conference@rina.org.uk


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