This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
very kayak fishe
ills
e r
m
sk an
sh
ou
ld
kn
ow
T h e ( e v e n M o r e ) C o M p l e T e K aya K a n g l e r / / 2 0 s k i L L s e v e r y K aya K f i s h e r M a n s h o u l d K n o w
12» survive a 15» save Gas
shark Attack
Use a lightweight trailer to tow your
In 2007, a suspected great white
kayak instead of roof racks. Roof
shark mauled the bow of California
racks increase the coefficient of
angler Dan Prather’s kayak off a
drag by presenting a greater surface
beach near San Francisco. Prather
area to the wind, whereas a trailer
was thrown from the boat and
(or pickup bed extender) keeps the
the shark retreated. Shaken but
load within the slipstream of your
P
h
unscathed, Prather paddled his dam-
o
t
o: J
vehicle. One Texas kayaker reports
aged boat back to shore.
e
r that his SportsRig MicroTrailer
ry
Comforting as the statistics may
w
h
($1,549; sportsrig.com) saves 1.7
I
te
P
h be—of the 108 shark attacks docu-
mpg compared to a roof rack. Or try
o
t
o:
d
mented on North America’s Pacific
the Rack and Roll KD65 ($2,149;
o
m
I
n coast in the 1900s, only five involved
rackandroll.com) or Malone Micro-
I
C
k G
r
kayaks—it’s a fact that kayak anglers
Sport (maloneautoracks.com).
e
C
o
are attracted to the same areas as
13» Repair a Hole
sharks. River mouths, coral reefs,
in Your kayak
» maKe friends: Most pros are ac-
murky areas, surf and sea lion haul-
Duct tape works in the short term,
quaintances or employees of regional
outs are all shark hotspots. The best
but when you get home repair cracks P
sales reps or dealers. “If somebody
defense against predatory sharks is to
h
o
and holes in your polyethylene kay-
t
o: J
were to email me directly, I would
keep your boat’s deck and surround-
ak with a plastic weld patch. Most
I
m
s
have them contact their regional sales
ing water free of blood and bait. If
h
a
boat manufacturers sell plastic weld
n
k
rep,” Sanford says.
a shark approaches your kayak, use
rods and patches; you’ll also need a
» shop aroUnd: With 50 pros
your paddle as a weapon. Aim for
heat gun and a rasp or scraper. Fire
already in the Ocean Kayak fold,
the snout before the shark bites; if
17» Make six
P
h
o
t
up your heat gun and melt the tip
o: C
“right now we’re not really looking
it persists, swing and claw at its eyes inches Look
h
a
of the weld rod and attach it at a
d
for new guys,” Sanford adds.
and gills.—Conor Mihell
45-degree angle to the boat a quar-
Like 12
h
o
o
V
e
r
ter-inch ahead of the crack. Hold
step 1: Hold the fish
the heat gun an inch or two from
at arm’s length.
16»
stay straight in
the boat and rod. Slowly push the
step 2: Set the camera
melting rod into the crack. Remove
to wide-angle.
the heat gun and cut the weld rod step 3: Hold the camera close to
Wind and Current
when you’re about a quarter-inch
the fish.
beyond the end of the crack. Use the step 4: Snap the picture
rasp to flatten and smooth the weld.
special effects: Use a wide
To repair a larger hole, do the same
aperture to create a shallow depth
thing using a patch of solid plastic field and focus on the fish, making
that’s cut slightly larger than the the angler’s face blur into the
hole.—Conor Mihell
background.
14» install a Motor
Free up your hands while trolling and save your shoulders for fighting fish.
The most common do-it-yourself, easily removable setup involves a milk
crate positioned amidships with a two-by-four wooden arm lag-bolted to
the top and extending outboard to hold an electric motor. Choose a trolling
motor with a relatively short shaft—30 inches is ideal. Secure your battery
(look for a marine trolling model with a capacity of 75 to 110 amp-hours)
inside the milk crate, which counterbalances the weight of the motor. Add
a 10-amp charger and you’re set. Just don’t be caught upstream without a
paddle.—Conor Mihell
step 1: Point your boat
in the direction that you
want to go.
step 2: Pick two distant
objects that are roughly in
line with each other.
step 3: Make sure the objects
are some distance apart (one
nearer, and one farther).
I
l
l
u
P
str
h
o
step 4: Paddle in a direction that
t
a
o:
t
I
d
o o
keeps the two objects in line.
n: P m
I
a
n
u
I
C
l
k G
m
—Alex Matthews
a
r
s
e
o
C
n
o
40

kayak angler spring 2009
Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64