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COUNTY LIFE STYLE


Reinvigorate your conservatory... and your home


The conservatory has seen numerous developments throughout the decades, becoming especially popular in the 90s as a cheap way to add extra space to a home. Technological advances and more sophisticated designs are boosting their popularity again and the conservatory is becoming an integral part of the house rather than an afterthought.


T


hese new materials are so good, in fact, that a replacement roof is often all a tired conservatory needs to get it back on its feet and fully functioning again.


Aging conservatories with polycarbonate roofs are cold in the winter and have poor thermal efficiency, which is why many people use them as little more than a storage space. The roof could also be susceptible to leaking. Replacing your polycarbonate roof with a solid replacement,


however, will not only transform your conservatory, but your home too.


www.countylifemagazines.co.uk


Neal Harper, General Manager at T&K Home


Improvements in Wellingborough, explained: “A solid roof will keep your conservatory warm in the winter and cool in the summer.


“This means you can use it all year round as an extra living


space, from a dining room or kitchen, to a study or even a ground floor bedroom. “Another benefit of replacing your conservatory roof and


turning your conservatory into a liveable space is it adds value to your home.


“As any estate agent will tell you, a conservatory with a polycarbonate roof might help you sell the house in the future, but it won’t add any actual value to it. “A conservatory with a solid roof, however, will, because it becomes an extra room, and could add around £10,000 to the property’s value.”


For more details call 01933 677444 email info@tkhi.co.uk or visit the website www.tkhi.co.uk


County Life 15


Advertiser’s Announcement


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