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NOISE, VIBRATION & FREQUENCY: STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS


 Acquiring sound from multiple points helps to create a 3D acoustic image of the material under test


A sound dimension forNDT


Acoustic cameras bring a new dimension to non-destructive testing (NDT) by adding sound to visual images in the hunt for defects in large composite aerospace structures


Structural Performance (CUSP) Laboratory in the School of Engineering, helping to establish it as an internationally recognised facility for audible acoustic and damage detection research. The advanced Gfai Fibonacci 96-channel


A


acoustic camera with associated NoiseImage software will be primarily used for the research and development of non- contact damage detection techniques using audible acoustics (AA) for composite materials within the aerospace industry.


SOUND ANALYSIS & OVERLAID IMAGES Available in 72, 96 and 120 channel versions, the highly flexible Fibonacci acoustic camera utilises an array of microphones and an optical camera to identify and locate sound in 2Dand 3D spaces in a remote and non-contactmanner


cSoft Sound & Vibration has recently supplied a state-of-the- art Fibonacci array acoustic camera fromGerman company Gfai for Cardiff University’s


by overlaying the audible source location on still or video images of the object. Easy to use and portable, the acoustic


camera is suitable for a variety of sound analysis and source localisation applications across a range of industrial sectors, including aerospace, automotive, consumer products, psychoacoustics, environmental,musical instrument design, railway and zoological industries. The Cardiff University acoustic camera


offers dual functions and is capable of locating audible sources at low and high frequencies, using holography and beamforming respectively. The accompanyingNoiseImage software


enables the acquisition, evaluation and storage of data, acoustic images andmovies.


INDUSTRIAL LINKS Funding for the acoustic camera was secured by DrMatthew Pearson, a newly appointed lecturer within the CUSP research group at the School of Engineering, whose research helps to


develop new and enhanced structural healthmonitoring (SHM) techniques for a range of aerospace applications. Dr Pearson has worked as the lead


researcher on several industrial research projects including two successfully completed Innovate UK projects (SHeMS and SANDWICH), one on-going Innovate UK project (Sentient) and an industrially funded project with Baosteel looking into electrical transformer noise. This has resulted in himdeveloping


strong links with companies including Airbus, BAE Systems, Boeing, Dstl, Marshall Aerospace,MBDA,Microsemi, Mistras Group and theMoD. Dr Pearson was supported in his


funding application by Dr Rhys Pullin and Prof Carol Featherston (both CUSP) who investigate damage detection techniques, a major area of national importance as identified by both the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Innovate UK. The damage detection work focuses on techniques such


October 2017 /// Environmental Engineering /// 35





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