This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE FOCUS: CULTURAL EDUCATIONATION FEAT ATURE FOCUS: CULT LTURAL EDUCAT


Photo credit Kicki Frisch Cultural opportunities for all Cultural opport I


n our second feature thismonth on the importance of cultural education in schools, we hear fromtw


spectacles of opera and dance to schoolchildren in the UK. The Donkey Sanctuary


ry has joined forceswith the Born


Free Foundation, LionAid and Olsen Verlag publishers in support of ‘#lionopera’, by the leading young British composer and founder of Olsen Verlag, James Olsen.Meanwhile, Feld Entertainment, theworldwide leader in producing and presenting live touring family entertainment experiences and the


producers of Disney On Ice, has teamed up with iChild.co.uk, a leading child development and education resource


website, and leader in the development and running ofmajor family engagement programmes and competitions through nurseries and schools, to bring themagical powers of story and dance into the


classroomto provide positive outcomes for childrenwith ‘Fit to Dance’, inspired by Disney On Ice.


n our second feature this month on the importance of cultural education in schools, we hear from two organisations bringing the spectacles of opera and dance to schoolchildren in the UK. The Donkey Sanctuary has joined forces with the Born Free Foundation, LionAid and Olsen Verlag publishers in support of ‘#lionopera’, by the leading young British composer and founder of Olsen Verlag, James Olsen. Meanwhile, Feld Entertainment, the worldwide leader in producing and presenting live touring family entertainment experiences and the producers of Disney On Ice, has teamed up with iChild.co.uk, a leading child development and education resource website, and leader in the development and running of major family engagement programmes and competitions through nurseries and schools, to bring the magical powers of story and dance into the classroom to provide positive outcomes for children with ‘Fit to Dance’, inspired by Disney On Ice.


two organisations bringing the


According to James Olsen, we need to change the perception that young people have about cultural forms such as opera.


“Opera is a word which comes with a lot of baggage: ‘fancy’ and ‘fat ladies singing in foreign languages’ were some of the things it brought to mind for members of the Beckenham Junior Choir and Youth Voices when we started work on #lionopera together.


“One of the aims of this project is to change that perception. By writing a series of children’s operas which are entertaining and rewarding for youngsters to perform, it’s possible to show that opera doesn’t necessarily fit in with our stereotypes: at its heart, opera is about


storytelling with music, words and theatre.Many 32 www


choir members later expressed their surprise at discovering that opera can be funny and moving, that it can engage their community.


“Another central aim is to develop a fresh approach to bringing new classical music to schools. Traditionally, outreach programmes run by major arts institutions have been costly endeavours where professional musicians deliver projects in person; at best, their reach is necessarily limited by available funds while, at worst, they can feel like the elite parachuting in and failing to engage participants, or to leave a legacy.


“#lionopera, by contrast, is intended to be lightweight and scalable, with the focus on enabling schools to produce their own production of new operas even if they do not have much music capability. Participation is free, materials can be downloaded and photocopied by schools, a backing CD will be provided to schools who need it, and we are providing a range of digital resources to support both pupils and teachers, including videos on acting and directing in partnership with the Birmingham Repertory Theatre. There is scope for schools to arrange workshops in person, too.


“The operas themselves are also designed as a gateway to a wide cultural heritage: replete with references to everything from familiar children’s films (The Lion King,Madagascar) to masterpieces by Bach,Mozart andWagner, they attempt to plant seeds which may or may not bear fruit one day. If, years from now, one child involved accidentally hears part of Bach’s St John Passion, is reminded of my opera and continues to listen, the project will have had a positive outcome. “Awareness of animals and conservation issues are also developed. Because the two protagonists are a lion and a donkey, I am delighted to be working with The Donkey Sanctuary, the Born


www.education-today.co.uk.co.uk December 2017 2017 rtunities for all


Free Foundation and LionAid to provide schools with tie-in teaching materials about lions and donkeys for Key Stage 2 science, as well as school visits and video content. In our increasingly urban and digital life, it’s easy for us to forget that our relationship with the natural world is a crucial part of our culture, too.We want to be able to provide an opportunity for children to explore their views on animals and the global issues that threaten them—they are, after all, the policy makers and animal carers of the future.


“Take The Donkey Sanctuary: their involvement in this project gives them the opportunity to create additional awareness and empathy for


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48